Person Page - 255

Home Index Surnames Locations

Morris MILLER

M, #I12701

Family

Marriage 1 : Yetta RINESAS

  1. Phillip MILLER

Sources

  1. FamilySearch.org, LDS Family search website

: 23 August 2015
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Yetta RINESAS

F, #I12702

Family

Marriage 1 : Morris MILLER

  1. Phillip MILLER

Sources

  1. FamilySearch.org, LDS Family search website

: 23 August 2015
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Kenneth M BARBER

M, #I12703, b. abt. 1907

Family

Marriage 1 : Zelda (Barbara) GREMS m. 26 September 1974 San Diego, San Diego, California, USA, b. 24 January 1911, d. 28 October 2004

: 23 August 2015
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John GREMS

M, #I12704

Sources

  1. 1915 Kansas State Census,

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Ruby GREMS

F, #I12705

Sources

  1. 1915 Kansas State Census,

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Elmer GREMS

M, #I12706

Sources

  1. 1915 Kansas State Census,

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Ruth GREMS

F, #I12707

Sources

  1. 1915 Kansas State Census,

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Edna GREMS

F, #I12708

Sources

  1. 1915 Kansas State Census,

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Alton GREMS

M, #I12709

Sources

  1. 1915 Kansas State Census,

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Versil GREMS

M, #I12710

Sources

  1. 1915 Kansas State Census,

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Frances (Frank) GREMS

M, #I12711

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Florence GREMS

F, #I12712

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Ruby GREMS

F, #I12713

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Hillary Ida SKLAR

F, #I12714

: 23 August 2015
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Florence SAMUELS

F, #I12715

Family

Marriage 1 : Saul BRAUN

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 20 September 2015
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Saul BRAUN

M, #I12716

Family

Marriage 1 : Florence SAMUELS

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 20 September 2015
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Beatrice SAMUELS

F, #I12717

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 20 September 2015
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Samuel ROSENBERG

M, #I12718, b. 1857

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 20 September 2015
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Nisha DEBAER

F, #I12719

Family

Marriage 1 : NN BAILEY

: 23 August 2015
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Asher WIZANSKI

M, #I12720, b. 1817

Family

Marriage 1 : Bejli , b. 1827

  1.    Ruchama WIZANSKI, b. 1848

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 20 September 2015
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John BROWN

M, #I12721

Family

Marriage 1 : Rachel EKBLOM

: 23 August 2015
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Rachel EKBLOM

F, #I12722

Family

Marriage 1 : John BROWN

: 23 August 2015
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NN BAILEY

M, #I12723

Family

Marriage 1 : Nisha DEBAER

: 23 August 2015
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Allen SECTER

M, #I12724, b. 10 April 1904, d. 30 November 1956

Family

Marriage 1 : Louise PLOTKIN m. 11 April 1938 St Joseph, Indiana, USA, b. 21 March 1907, d. 30 November 1956

: 23 August 2015
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HALPOIN

F, #I12725

Family

Marriage 1 : SECTER

  1. Allen SECTER, b. 10 April 1904, d. 30 November 1956

: 23 August 2015
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SECTER

M, #I12726

Family

Marriage 1 : HALPOIN

  1. Allen SECTER, b. 10 April 1904, d. 30 November 1956

: 23 August 2015
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Morris WOLK

M, #I12727

Family

Marriage 1 : Bessie CAPLIN

  1. Charles WOLK, b. 10 December 1912

: 23 August 2015
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Bessie CAPLIN

F, #I12728

Family

Marriage 1 : Morris WOLK

  1. Charles WOLK, b. 10 December 1912

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Betty C SABAD

F, #I12729, b. abt. 1918

Family

Marriage 1 : Richard Nathan PLOTKIN m. 10 November 1940 Akron, Summit, Ohio, USA, b. 26 April 1914, d. 18 January 1947

: 23 August 2015
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Saul SABAD

M, #I12730

Family

Marriage 1 : Celia JACOBSON

  1. Betty C SABAD, b. abt. 1918

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Celia JACOBSON

F, #I12731

Family

Marriage 1 : Saul SABAD

  1. Betty C SABAD, b. abt. 1918

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Rudolph JOSEPHS

M, #I12732, b. abt. 1909

Family

Marriage 1 : Ruth Dorothy PLOTKIN , b. 21 August 1916, d. 30 September 2000

Sources

  1. 1940 census online,

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Lois H MARCUS

F, #I12733, b. 26 November 1924, d. 26 July 2009

Family

Marriage 1 : Morton M HUNT m. 1946 Philadelphia, Delaware, Pennsylvania, USA

Notes:

n uncommon woman, an uncommon life

Opera singer Lois Hunt now lives a quiet life in Roosevelt
BY LINDA DeNICOLA
Staff Writer
BY LINDA DeNICOLA
Staff Writer

Lois Hunt and Earl Wrightson performed with more than 50 symphonies.Lois Hunt and Earl Wrightson performed with more than 50 symphonies.
Like an opera in three acts, the libretto of Lois Hunt’s life is dramatic and colorful, but for the most part, without the tragedy and duplicity that makes opera so melodramatic.

The first act - growing up in Pennsylvania and developing her powerful lyric soprano voice - also includes winning a prestigious prize that allowed Hunt entrée into the highest echelon of the opera world, the Metropolitan Opera. For five years, from 1949-53, she sang lead parts before crossing over into legitimate theater.

There is no intermission before the long second act begins when she meets Earl Wrightson and teams up with him as a musical theater duo who travel all over the country. They stay together as a couple until he dies in 1993, in their Oyster Bay, N.Y., home.

In most operas, the story ends when a leading character dies. In some ways, Wrightson’s death is an ending for Hunt. She never performs again. After a five-year intermission, she redefines her life.

The third act has her settled in an original, flat-roofed Bauhaus home in the small western Monmouth County community of Roosevelt, across the street from her son, Councilman Jeff Hunt, and near the large extended family of her daughter-in-law, Jessica Hecht, whose relatives were among the first 200 residents to settle in the 2-square-mile borough.

"I was an only child, but I’m surrounded by family now," Hunt said.

A small woman, she is still elegant, with a vibrant speaking voice and a joie de vivre that must have been at the heart of the girl who became the woman who sang "Musetta" from "La Boheme," "Lauretta" from "Gianni Schicchi," "Adele" from "Die Fledermaus" and "Papagena" from "Magic Flute" at the Met when she was still in her early 20s.

Hunt’s career spans more than 50 years.

"I starting singing when I was very young and immediately went on the road," she said. "The Academy of Music in Philadelphia was my shrine. I used to sneak out of high school to go there."

She was a young woman when she had her concert debut at the Barkley Hotel in 1946 and had been singing professionally for three years when she won the prestigious Metropolitan Opera’s Audition of the Air in 1949.

"That was a major event in the country," she said. "Smaller things were important in those days."

Hunt said she was encouraged to audition by the assistant manager of the Metropolitan Opera.

"They knew me because I made my opera debut in Central City, Colo., in Fidelio in 1947."

She sang the part of Marzellina, the daughter.

"The staff and conductor were from the Met [Metropolitan Opera]. People at the Met kept track of new singers. They looked for integrity as an artist," she said.

Not only did she perform live at the opera house, but she also was in the Metropolitan Opera’s first television production of "Die Fledermaus" in 1953, directed by Garson Kanin.

While she was singing at the Met, Earl Wrightson, a baritone, was making a name for himself with his own television shows, the "At Home Show," which followed the "Arthur Godfrey Show" on CBS, and the "American Musical Theater."

"I was a soprano at the Met at the time. He invited me to sing on the ‘At Home Show.’ "

The two got along so well that she became a regular guest star.

Around that time, Robert Q. Lewis was starting a daily TV variety show and was looking for two singers.

"He hired us, and we did that for 2 1/2 years, from 1953-56, five days a week, and a radio show on Saturday mornings," she said. "In those days, there was a demand for us across the country. We got a lot of exposure singing about town. We were traveling all of the time. We began to concertize in winter and do musicals in the summer in tent theaters all over the country."

The list of musical theater productions in which she had major roles includes "Brigadoon," "Carousel," "Desert Song," "Fiddler on the Roof," "Gigi," "The King and I," "A Little Night Music" and ‘South Pacific."

She was working on the Lewis show when her son was born.

"My mother lived with us and took care of Jeff all of the time," she said. "She was a violinist and taught him piano and sports."

Hunt’s mother, Bertie, was always supportive of her daughter’s singing career.

"She was a chief cheerleader, supporter and chauffeur," Hunt said. "She came to every class, every lesson, and drove me to every rehearsal for a lot of years."

Hunt started studying voice in junior high school in the late 1930s. Her last tour, with Wrightson, was in The Sound of Music in 1979-80.

"We did 97 cities in six months, 198 performances," she said. "We were the only two members of the cast whose understudies never went on. We were consummate professionals who took great pride in our professionalism and integrity. We wanted the music to be right. The orchestras were so happy to have our music in front of them. Our music was rich and lush."

"All I knew was music," she added. "It was my fun, my life, my work. I never went on vacations. I was having fun all of the time. There was a lot at stake."

Hunt never needed amplification - not in her long singing career, nor in her interesting life, and certainly not on stage at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City or at the many other opera houses where she performed before crossing over to legitimate theater.

After making the decision to focus on musical theater, she sang in classical and pop concerts over the radio and on television, and in churches and synagogues.

"I did a lot of oratorio," she said. "I love singing in church. We sang in the Great Auditorium in Ocean Grove," she added.

Hunt and Wrightson also sang in Canada and did two around-the-world Rotterdam cruises. They have recorded over 45 albums with Columbia and RCA. But one of the highlights of her career was singing at the White House during Lyndon B. Johnson’s presidency and in the Johnsons’ home at "The Elms," when Johnson was vice president.

Hunt wrote about that experience in the Roosevelt newsletter.

She and Wrightson were starring at the Blue Room of the Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C., when they received a phone call from Liz Carpenter, Lady Byrd’s social secretary, asking them to perform at a luncheon in then-Vice President Johnson’s home.

The luncheon was for the wives of Japanese cabinet ministers who would be attending a meeting at the White House.

The evening before the performance, they were invited to see the room where the luncheon was to be held and to join Lady Byrd for a drink. The First Lady said the vice president was upstairs in the bedroom with a bad cold, but that he wanted to meet them.

"Mr. Vice President was indeed upstairs in his green bedroom, in his green silk pajamas with his initials, LBJ, embroidered from just below his shoulder to just above his ankle," Hunt said, laughing at the fact that the first time she met the man who was to become president of the United States, he was in his pajamas.

That was only the first of a number of singing engagements when Mrs. Johnson needed some "classy entertainment," Hunt said.

Hunt and Wrightson made the "audience feel as comfortable as warm hands," one reviewer wrote in the Palm Beach Daily News. The show was titled, "On the Lighter Side," and the reviewer said that they were "hams of premier quality."

Hunt’s son and daughter-in-law have a game the family plays in the car when they go on trips.

"They name a city and I have to come up with a story," she said. "I’ve been in so many of them [cities]."

But living for so long at such a high pitch has worn her out.

"It was very demanding, very tiring and extraordinarily exhilarating," she said.

"I knew 60-odd roles by the time I stopped singing in 1987. I loved it all. I loved the atmosphere and the people. I loved communicating with all of those people. I was a big proponent of opera in English.

Hunt and Wrightson - or Wrightson and Hunt, as they were always billed - shared music and their lives.

"I loved working with Earl," Hunt said. "We respected each other as artists so much."

She misses her beloved Earl Wrightson a great deal, but she is tired now and content to listen to the music of her friends and family and, on occasion, to listen to her own exceptional recordings with Wrightson.

The libretto for the third act says to picture Lois Hunt at home. She has added a large, light, plant-filled music room onto the back of her house in the woods to hold the piano that her daughter-in-law uses to give lessons. Her daughter-in-law is playing the piano, and her son is sitting next to his mother on the comfortable couch, listening.

It is December and one of Hunt’s beautiful sequined gowns is draped over a round table for Christmas, and another is wrapped around the bottom of a Christmas tree. She is content to be at home in her small town.

The third act is unfinished. Hunt is surrounded by friends, family, flowers, cats, a "granddog" and the deer that come up to her back door for the corn that she buys for them.
========================
Lois Hunt
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lois Hunt and Earl Wrightson in 1963.
Lois Hunt (November 26, 1924 - July 26, 2009) was an American lyric soprano who had spent some of her earlier career performing at New York City's Metropolitan Opera and later spent four decades performing and recording classical music and musical theater numbers nationwide together with baritone Earl Wrightson.

Contents [hide]
1 Early life and training
2 Performing at the Met and on the road
3 Personal
4 References
Early life and training[edit]
She was born in York, Pennsylvania as Lois Harriet Marcus. She began singing while in elementary school and began a professional career after working with opera coaches in Philadelphia. She had been singing professionally for three years when a Metropolitan Opera assistant manager who had seen her sing in a performance in Colorado of Ludwig van Beethoven's only opera, Fidelio, convinced her to head to New York City. There she earned a contract with the Met after her participation in the opera company's 1949 Auditions of the Air competition.[1]

Performing at the Met and on the road[edit]
While with the Met, Hunt sang such roles as Adele in Die Fledermaus by Johann Strauss II, Papagena in Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's The Magic Flute, as well as Musetta in La bohème and Lauretta in Gianni Schicchi, both written by Giacomo Puccini.[2] She sang the role of Adele in a 1953 presentation of a 90-minute version of Die Fledermaus on television, the first created by the Met for the new medium.[1]

She appeared on Earl Wrightson At Home in the early 1950s, having been a listener of the host's radio show when she was a teenager. She became a frequent performer on the show and developed an intimate personal relationship with Earl Wrightson that lasted for decades. The two appeared on television in the mid-1950s on The Robert Q. Lewis Show, a variety program. They went on tour around the United States, performing musical numbers and operettas at nightclubs and concert venues. They recorded musical selections on several albums for Columbia Records, including numbers by Jerome Kern and Sigmund Romberg recorded with the Percy Faith orchestra. Their final performances together were in a 97-city tour over six months in 1979 and 1980 of The Sound of Music, in which Hunt proudly stated that they "were the only two members of the cast whose understudies never went on", reflecting their "great pride in our professionalism and integrity".[1]

While performing at the Shoreham Hotel in Washington, D.C. in the early 1960s, they received an invitation sent on behalf of Lady Bird Johnson to perform at her home for the wives of a group of Japanese government officials who would be attending meetings at the White House. While visiting the Johnsons' residence the evening before their performance, Hunt and Wrightson were invited upstairs to meet the vice president. Lyndon Johnson, suffering from a cold, greeted them "in his green silk pajamas with his initials, LBJ, embroidered from just below his shoulder to just above his ankle". She later joked about their having met the future president for the first time while he was in his pajamas.[2]

Personal[edit]
A resident of Frenchtown, New Jersey at the time of her death, Hunt had earlier lived in Roosevelt, New Jersey, having moved there in 1997 from Oyster Bay, New York. Hunt enjoyed the culture of Roosevelt, and its "many artists and musicians".[3] She died at age 84 on July 26, 2009, in Manhattan due to complications of cardiac surgery. She was survived by a son. Her marriage to Morton M. Hunt had ended in divorce, while her relationship with Wrightson ended with his death in 1993.[1]

References[edit]
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Lois Hunt.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Grimes, William. "Lois Hunt, Half of Popular Operatic Duo, Dies at 84", The New York Times, July 28, 2009. Accessed July 28, 2009.
^ Jump up to: a b DeNicola, Linda. "An uncommon woman, an uncommon life: Opera singer Lois Hunt now lives a quiet life in Roosevelt", Tri-Town News, January 22, 2004. Accessed July 28, 2009.
Jump up ^ Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Roosevelt, N.J.; A New Deal Enclave Friendly to the Arts", The New York Times, February 3, 2002. Accessed July 28, 2009.

Sources

  1. 1930 Census online,

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ZETTA

F, #I12734, b. abt. 1872

Family

Marriage 1 : Julius JACOBSON , b. abt. 1865, d. 02 November 1934

  1. Bertha (Bertie) JACOBSON

Sources

  1. 1940 census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Bejli

F, #I12735, b. 1827

Family

Marriage 1 : Asher WIZANSKI , b. 1817

  1.    Ruchama WIZANSKI, b. 1848

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 20 September 2015
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Ruchama WIZANSKI

F, #I12736, b. 1848

: 20 September 2015
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Julius JACOBSON

M, #I12737, b. abt. 1865, d. 02 November 1934

Family

Marriage 1 : ZETTA , b. abt. 1872

  1. Bertha (Bertie) JACOBSON

: 23 August 2015
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Jacob LEVINE

M, #I12738

Family

Marriage 1 : Bessie COHN , b. abt. 1879

  1. Nettie LEVINE, b. 02 March 1917
  2.    Minnie LEVINE, b. abt. 1903
  3.    Ida LEVINE, b. abt. 1913
  4.    Genette LEVINE, b. abt. 1919
  5.    Israel LEVINE, b. abt. 1913

: 23 August 2015
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Bessie COHN

F, #I12739, b. abt. 1879

Family

Marriage 1 : Jacob LEVINE

  1. Nettie LEVINE, b. 02 March 1917
  2.    Minnie LEVINE, b. abt. 1903
  3.    Ida LEVINE, b. abt. 1913
  4.    Genette LEVINE, b. abt. 1919
  5.    Israel LEVINE, b. abt. 1913

Sources

  1. 1940 census online,
  2. 1930 Census online,

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Minnie LEVINE

F, #I12740, b. abt. 1903

Sources

  1. 1940 census online,

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Ida LEVINE

F, #I12741, b. abt. 1913

Sources

  1. 1940 census online,

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Genette LEVINE

F, #I12742, b. abt. 1919

Sources

  1. 1930 Census online,

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Israel LEVINE

M, #I12743, b. abt. 1913

Sources

  1. 1930 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Keith Jan GARDNER

M, #I12744

Family

Marriage 1 : Jean Emily DEBAER

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Samuel FEINMAN

M, #I12745

Family

Marriage 1 : Ida PICKINS

  1. Rose FEINMAN, b. 21 February 1918, d. 01 November 2008

: 23 August 2015
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Ida PICKINS

F, #I12746

Family

Marriage 1 : Samuel FEINMAN

  1. Rose FEINMAN, b. 21 February 1918, d. 01 November 2008

: 23 August 2015
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Gordon Kenneth GOLDBERG

M, #I12747

Family

Marriage 1 : Myrna ADLER

  1. Robert Leslie GOLDBERG

: 23 August 2015
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Myrna ADLER

F, #I12748

Family

Marriage 1 : Gordon Kenneth GOLDBERG

  1. Robert Leslie GOLDBERG

: 23 August 2015
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Morton M HUNT

M, #I12749

Family

Marriage 1 : Lois H MARCUS m. 1946 Philadelphia, Delaware, Pennsylvania, USA, b. 26 November 1924, d. 26 July 2009

: 23 August 2015
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Carole Hope DEBAER

F, #I12750

Notes:

in communications and theatre. For the past 8 years, she, her husband Tony and their three dogs, have lived in Maui, Hawaii, most recently in a home perched high on a cliff overlooking the ocean. This book is for my father, who told us his made-up tale about "Candyland" when we were tiny kids. This book is dedicated to my first grandson, Finn, who has brought fantasy and magic back into my life.

Bruce Holub Green in 1980
John Curtis Brown, 1971
Shyam Bhatnagar earlier; possibly father of daughter

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