Person Page - 205

Home Index Surnames Locations

Joseph Edward GRIFF

M, #I10201, b. abt. 1854

Family

Marriage 1 : Lillie NOAH m. 25 February 1880 New Y ork, New York USA

Sources

  1. 1870 census online, Familysearch.org

: 23 August 2015
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Samuel GRIFF

M, #I10202, b. abt. 1858

Sources

  1. 1870 census online, Familysearch.org

: 23 August 2015
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Albert GRIFF

M, #I10203, b. abt. 1860

: 23 August 2015
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Lillie NOAH

F, #I10204

Family

Marriage 1 : Joseph Edward GRIFF m. 25 February 1880 New Y ork, New York USA, b. abt. 1854

Sources

  1. FamilySearch.org, LDS Family search website

: 23 August 2015
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Nathan NOAH

M, #I10205

Family

Marriage 1 : Phoebe SIMMONS

  1. Lillie NOAH

Sources

  1. FamilySearch.org, LDS Family search website

: 23 August 2015
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Phoebe SIMMONS

F, #I10206

Family

Marriage 1 : Nathan NOAH

  1. Lillie NOAH

Sources

  1. FamilySearch.org, LDS Family search website

: 23 August 2015
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Isaac DAVIDSON

M, #I10207, b. 14 August 1853, d. 22 December 1925

Family

Marriage 1 : Adele POLLACK m. 06 March 1881 Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, b. abt. 1864

  1.    David Paul DAVIDSON, b. abt. 1884
  2.    Emilie DAVIDSON, b. abt. 1888
  3.    Levi (Lee) DAVIDSON, b. abt. 1891
  4. Arthur DAVIDSON, b. 14 June 1892
  5.    Uriah DAVIDSON, b. abt. 1903

Notes:

ISAAC DAVIDSON

Son of Levi and Sarah Davidson, was born at Helniarsliausen, Province of Hessen Nassau,
Germany, on the 14th day of August, 1853. Mr. Davidson was educated at his father's school
and had private lessons in French and Latin up to his thirteenth year, when he came to
America to live with his uncles in New York, and for several years attended night schools. He
started in business life when he was a little over thirteen years of age as clerk for his uncles,
and later became a bookkeeper, then agent for a paper mill and later went to Alabama and
started a business there, and since 188-1 has been in the furniture business in Baltimore. Mr.
Davidson is a director of the Hebrew Education Society and of the local branch, Alliance
Israelite Universelle. He is a trustee of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, and for many
years chairman of their religious school commissioners. Mr. Davidson's father was cantor
and teacher for forty-three years of the congregation at Helmarshausen and was noted for his
sturdy honesty, devotion to duty and to his faith, as well as to his family. Levi Davidson
came from a family of Chasans, and his wife, Sarah, was a grajaddaughter of Joseph Abraham
Friedlander, rabbi of Westphalia, Prussia. Mr. Isaac Davidson is a member of the Royal
Arcanum, the Heptasophs, Merchants' and Manufacturers' Association, Travelers' and IVIer-
chants' Association, Red Cross Society, Theological Seminary, N. Y., the National Consumptive
Home, Denver, and many other societies. The success which Mr. Davidson has achieved in
life he attributes to honesty, sobriety and industry, which habits he acquired early in life
through the responsibilities which came to him through the desire and necessity to help his
parents and his numerous brothers and sisters, demanding that he should practice the most
rigid economy and frugality. On March 6, 1881, Mr. Davidson married Miss Adele Pollack,
daughter of the late Uriah A. Pollack, to whose business he succeeded. Mr. Davidson has had
seven children, five of whom are living.
-------------------------
OLLACK'S

ISAAC DAVIDSON WILLIAM B. FALLON
Proprietors

Furniture, Upholstering, Rugs, Mattresses
and Bedding

NORTHEAST CORNER OF

HOWARD AND SARATOGA STREETS

BALTIMORE, MD.

This old-established house was founded in 1846 by Abram Pollack, who came to
this country from Prussia in that year. Mr. Abram Pollack served in the Prussian
Army, and for efficient services was offered advancement as officer if he would change
his faith. This he refused to do, resigned from the army and learned the trade of
upholstering and mattress-making. His first establishment in Baltimore was on
Howard Street, in the block between Mulberry and Franklin .Streets. In 1847 he moved
to what was, under the old numbering system, No. 96, and now 315 North Howard
Street, at w^hich location the firm remained for sixty-two years, or until March 1st,
current year (1909), at which time it moved to the magnificent new building at tlie
northeast corner of Howard and Saratoga Streets.

Uriah A. Pollack, son of Abram Pollack, grew up in the business, and in 18G4
assumed charge vmder his own name. In 1875 a new building was erected and the furni-
ture line was added. In 1884 Mr. Isaac Davidson, a son-in-law, entered the business
and was associated with the firm until 1897, at which time Mr. Pollack died. ^Ir.
Davidson then assumed the business and took into partnership Mr. Wm. B. Fallon,
who had been connected with the house for twelve years previous. The firm name, how-
ever, was not changed. In addition to the large and handsome building occupied by the
firm as showrooms and warehouse, extensive workshops are operated at 313, 315 and
317 Tyson Street,, which employ a large corps of upholsterers, mattress-makers, cabinet-
makers, flnisli6J"S; and other pertinent artisans. The firm has been most successful and
handles much large institution work and fulfilled a great number of important con-
tracts, such as the Naval Academy at Annapolis. Md., and in 1907 partly refurnished
the new Custom House at Baltimore. The reputation of the "House of Pollack's" for
honesty, reliability and high-class wares is widely recognized and firmly establislied.
In fact, the name of '"Pollack's" in Baltimore is synonymous with all that excellence,
superiority and integrity implies.

Sources

  1. Baltimore, Jews of Baltimore (book, see citation), The Jews of Baltimore; an historical summary of their progress andstatus as citizens of Baltimore from early days to the year nineteenhundred and ten (1910) By Isidor Blum, Online on archive.org (downloadable in different formats)

: 23 August 2015
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Levi DAVIDSON

M, #I10208

Family

Marriage 1 : Sarah HAGEDORN

  1. Isaac DAVIDSON, b. 14 August 1853, d. 22 December 1925
  2. David DAVIDSON, b. abt. 1856

Sources

  1. Baltimore, Jews of Baltimore (book, see citation), The Jews of Baltimore; an historical summary of their progress andstatus as citizens of Baltimore from early days to the year nineteenhundred and ten (1910) By Isidor Blum, Online on archive.org (downloadable in different formats)

: 23 August 2015
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Sarah HAGEDORN

F, #I10209

Family

Marriage 1 : Levi DAVIDSON

  1. Isaac DAVIDSON, b. 14 August 1853, d. 22 December 1925
  2. David DAVIDSON, b. abt. 1856

Sources

  1. Baltimore, Jews of Baltimore (book, see citation), The Jews of Baltimore; an historical summary of their progress andstatus as citizens of Baltimore from early days to the year nineteenhundred and ten (1910) By Isidor Blum, Online on archive.org (downloadable in different formats)
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),

: 23 August 2015
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Abraham (Abram) POLLACK

M, #I10210, b. abt. 1804, d. 15 May 1878

Family

Marriage 1 : Julie , b. abt. 1813

  1. Uriah A POLLACK, b. abt. 1839, d. 1897
  2. Eliza POLLACK, b. abt. 1846

Notes:

POLLACK'S

ISAAC DAVIDSON WILLIAM B. FALLON
Proprietors

Furniture, Upholstering, Rugs, Mattresses
and Bedding

NORTHEAST CORNER OF

HOWARD AND SARATOGA STREETS

BALTIMORE, MD.

This old-established house was founded in 1846 by Abram Pollack, who came to
this country from Prussia in that year. Mr. Abram Pollack served in the Prussian
Army, and for efficient services was offered advancement as officer if he would change
his faith. This he refused to do, resigned from the army and learned the trade of
upholstering and mattress-making. His first establishment in Baltimore was on
Howard Street, in the block between Mulberry and Franklin .Streets. In 1847 he moved
to what was, under the old numbering system, No. 96, and now 315 North Howard
Street, at w^hich location the firm remained for sixty-two years, or until March 1st,
current year (1909), at which time it moved to the magnificent new building at tlie
northeast corner of Howard and Saratoga Streets.

Uriah A. Pollack, son of Abram Pollack, grew up in the business, and in 18G4
assumed charge vmder his own name. In 1875 a new building was erected and the furni-
ture line was added. In 1884 Mr. Isaac Davidson, a son-in-law, entered the business
and was associated with the firm until 1897, at which time Mr. Pollack died. ^Ir.
Davidson then assumed the business and took into partnership Mr. Wm. B. Fallon,
who had been connected with the house for twelve years previous. The firm name, how-
ever, was not changed. In addition to the large and handsome building occupied by the
firm as showrooms and warehouse, extensive workshops are operated at 313, 315 and
317 Tyson Street,, which employ a large corps of upholsterers, mattress-makers, cabinet-
makers, flnisli6J"S; and other pertinent artisans. The firm has been most successful and
handles much large institution work and fulfilled a great number of important con-
tracts, such as the Naval Academy at Annapolis. Md., and in 1907 partly refurnished
the new Custom House at Baltimore. The reputation of the "House of Pollack's" for
honesty, reliability and high-class wares is widely recognized and firmly establislied.
In fact, the name of '"Pollack's" in Baltimore is synonymous with all that excellence,
superiority and integrity implies.

Sources

  1. FamilySearch.org, LDS Family search website

: 05 November 2015
[TOP]


David Paul DAVIDSON

M, #I10211, b. abt. 1884

Sources

  1. 1900 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Emilie DAVIDSON

M, #I10212, b. abt. 1888

Sources

  1. 1900 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Levi (Lee) DAVIDSON

M, #I10213, b. abt. 1891

Sources

  1. 1900 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Arthur DAVIDSON

M, #I10214, b. 14 June 1892

Family

Marriage 1 : Theresa G

  1.    Isaac DAVIDSON, b. abt. 1927, d. 03 October 1933

Sources

  1. 1900 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Uriah DAVIDSON

M, #I10215, b. abt. 1903

Sources

  1. 1920 Census online, From FamilySearch.org

: 23 August 2015
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David DAVIDSON

M, #I10216, b. abt. 1856

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. 1920 Census online, From FamilySearch.org

: 23 August 2015
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Theresa G

F, #I10217

Family

Marriage 1 : Arthur DAVIDSON , b. 14 June 1892

  1.    Isaac DAVIDSON, b. abt. 1927, d. 03 October 1933

Sources

  1. 1930 Census online,

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Isaac DAVIDSON

M, #I10218, b. abt. 1927, d. 03 October 1933

Sources

  1. 1930 Census online,

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Esther (Emilie) FRIEDLANDER

F, #I10219, b. 26 June 1799, d. 21 April 1876

Family

Marriage 1 : Josef HAGEDORN

  1. Sarah HAGEDORN
  2. Abraham HAGEDORN, b. 26 October 1819, d. 15 May 1908
  3.    Jonas J (John) HAGEDORN, b. 20 March 1836, d. 09 October 1902
  4. Clara HAGEDORN
  5.    Isaac HAGEDORN
  6.    Moritz HAGEDORN
  7. Julia HAGEDORN
  8.    Levi HAGEDORN

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),
  3. Terry Schwartz on Geni.com,

: 23 August 2015
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Josef HAGEDORN

M, #I10220

Family

Marriage 1 : Esther (Emilie) FRIEDLANDER , b. 26 June 1799, d. 21 April 1876

  1. Sarah HAGEDORN
  2. Abraham HAGEDORN, b. 26 October 1819, d. 15 May 1908
  3.    Jonas J (John) HAGEDORN, b. 20 March 1836, d. 09 October 1902
  4. Clara HAGEDORN
  5.    Isaac HAGEDORN
  6.    Moritz HAGEDORN
  7. Julia HAGEDORN
  8.    Levi HAGEDORN

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),

: 23 August 2015
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Joseph Abraham FRIEDLANDER

M, #I10221, b. 17 March 1753, d. 26 November 1852

Family

Marriage 1 : Clärgen (Clara) SALMON , b. 16 April 1760, d. 16 April 1814

  1. Esther (Emilie) FRIEDLANDER, b. 26 June 1799, d. 21 April 1876
  2.    Abraham FRIEDLANDER

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),
  3. Ursula Matz on geni.com,

: 23 August 2015
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Clärgen (Clara) SALMON

F, #I10222, b. 16 April 1760, d. 16 April 1814

Family

Marriage 1 : Joseph Abraham FRIEDLANDER , b. 17 March 1753, d. 26 November 1852

  1. Esther (Emilie) FRIEDLANDER, b. 26 June 1799, d. 21 April 1876
  2.    Abraham FRIEDLANDER

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),
  3. Ursula Matz on geni.com,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Abraham HAGEDORN

M, #I10223, b. 26 October 1819, d. 15 May 1908

Family

Marriage 1 : Clara ROSENBAUM , b. 10 May 1825, d. 19 April 1897

  1. Phillip HAGEDORN, b. 17 January 1860, d. 23 July 1920
  2. Zachariah (Zack) HAGEDORN, b. 18 April 1856, d. 15 May 2012

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),
  3. Bruce H Cohen on Geni.com,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Jonas J (John) HAGEDORN

M, #I10224, b. 20 March 1836, d. 09 October 1902

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),
  3. Frank Fineshriber on Geni.com,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Clara HAGEDORN

F, #I10225

Family

Marriage 1 : Nn HERZFELD

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Isaac HAGEDORN

M, #I10226

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Nn HERZFELD

M, #I10227

Family

Marriage 1 : Clara HAGEDORN

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Moritz HAGEDORN

M, #I10228

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Julia HAGEDORN

F, #I10229

Family

Marriage 1 : Nn HERZFELD

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Nn HERZFELD

M, #I10230

Family

Marriage 1 : Julia HAGEDORN

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Levi HAGEDORN

M, #I10231

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Sabel-Sowers Web Site (on geni.com),

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Abraham FRIEDLANDER

M, #I10232

Sources

  1. Geni.com,
  2. Terry Schwartz on Geni.com,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Phillip HAGEDORN

M, #I10233, b. 17 January 1860, d. 23 July 1920

Family

Marriage 1 : Ursula (Lula) HEYMAN , d. 13 April 1952

Notes:



Overview
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HISTORY DEPARTMENT
Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities

OVERVIEW >> ALABAMA >> LANETT

Lanett, Alabama/West Point, Georgia

Lanett, Alabama and West Point, Georgia are true twin cities, located
right next to each across the Chattahoochee River. Streets that begin in Lanett end in West Point. Jews in West Point and Lanett formed one close-knit community that thrived for over a century before withering in recent decades.

Located in Chambers County, Bluffton, Alabama was chartered in 1865. Its location on the Chattahoochee River led to the construction of cotton mills, as the town became a regional industrial center processing the cotton grown in the area’s farms. Bluffton was so connected to these mills that the town changed its name to Lanett, in honor of Lafayette Lanier and Theodore Bennett, early textile mill owners. The local newspaper, the Chattahoochee Valley Times, would run several pages in every issue detailing news from each mill.

The story of the Jewish community in Lanett and West Point begins with the friendship of two immigrants in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Heyman Heyman was born in Prussia in 1825, and came to the United States in 1852, first settling in Philadelphia. There, he befriended the Bavarian-born Louis Merz. The two decided to move to LaGrange, Georgia, where Heyman worked as a bookkeeper in a Jewish-owned store while Merz peddled merchandise in the surrounding countryside. When a railroad was built connecting LaGrange to West Point in 1854, the two friends headed west, opening the dry goods store Heyman & Merz in West Point. Louis Merz’s sister Betty had immigrated to Cincinnati. On business trips north, Heyman would often visit her. The couple got married in Cincinnati in 1859 with Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise officiating. Heyman then brought his new wife south to live with him in West Point. Another Merz sibling, Daniel, came to West Point in 1860, joining his brother and brother-in-law’s business.

In 1860, Heyman and Louis Merz were thriving. Heyman owned $1200 in real estate and $6000 in personal property at the time. Their success was soon interrupted by war and tragedy. Louis Merz joined the West Point Guards at the start of the Civil War, and was later killed at the Battle of Antietam. Dan Merz and Heyman remained in Lanett during the war, buying a tan yard and tanning leather to make boots for Confederate soldiers. After the war, the Jewish community grew, much of it around the seven children of Heyman and Betty Heyman.

Phillip HagedornOther Jews made their way to the area, often intermingling with the Heyman family. Prussian-born John Hagedorn came to West Point in 1872, and later opened the store J.J. Hagedorn & Co. He soon brought two of his nephews, Zach and Philip Hagedorn (left), to town to help with the business. In 1883, the foundation of the Jewish community of Lanett was cemented when Zach and Philip Hagedorn married two of Heyman and Betty Heyman’s daughters, Jennie and Lula. The Heyman and Hagedorn families formed the nucleus of the area’s Jewish community for much of the next century.

It did not take Lanett and West Point Jews long to form a congregation. In 1859, the handful of Jews in the area came together to found Congregation Beth El (House of God). The congregation was always very small; it met in private homes for its first fifty years, though members did purchase land for a cemetery in West Point. The congregation embraced Reform Judaism, and later joined the Reform Union of American Hebrew Congregations (UAHC). In 1909, Betty Heyman donated a portion of her land that had earlier been a vegetable garden to the congregation for the construction of a temple. Beth El received contributions from both its members and local gentiles to raise the $3,000 it took to construct the modest building, which was located in Lanett. Rabbi David Marx of the Hebrew Benevolent Congregation in Atlanta led the dedication service.

Temple Beth ElAt the time of the temple’s dedication in 1909, about fifteen families belonged to Beth El, which attracted members from nearby towns like Opelika and LaFayette, Alabama, and LaGrange, Georgia. The congregation never had a full-time spiritual leader, but brought in rabbis from other cities once a month to lead services, often on Sundays. Rabbi Marx came to Lanett to lead services for thirty years, until he was too old to make the trip. He was replaced by Rabbi Eugene Blachschlager of Montgomery, who served Beth El monthly from 1946 to 1965. After 1965, Rabbi Alfred Goodman of Columbus, Georgia would travel to Lanett once a month. For the high holidays, the congregation would bring down rabbinic students from Hebrew Union College in Cincinnati to lead services. One of these student rabbis was Alexander Schindler, who went on to become the president of the UAHC.

When the temple was built, the small congregation began to elect officers and keep board minutes. Lee Heyman, the son of Heyman and Betty, served as the first president of Beth El, remaining in the position for over forty years until he died in 1952. Milton Cohen, who had married Jean Hagedorn, succeeded Heyman, serving as Beth El’s president from 1952 to 1967. James Maxwell was the last president of the congregation while Joe Herzfeld and Lee Herzberg were longtime officers.

The small congregation had a Sunday school to pass on Judaism to their children. The Jewish women of the area founded a chapter of the National Council of Jewish Women. The group oversaw the maintenance and upkeep of the temple and also organized community programs such as the annual Seder supper.

Heyman adJews in Lanett and West Point were part of the local merchant class, owning stores that catered to the cotton mill workers and area farmers. In 1919, these stores included: Lee Herzberg’s, which sold men’s clothing; Solomon Brothers, which sold dry goods; and Lee Heyman and Co., which sold furniture and dry goods. Each year, these Jews would advertise in the local newspaper that they would be closing their stores for the Jewish high holidays. Jews became active in civic life; Lee Heyman was elected to the Lanett city council in 1893, garnering more votes than any other council candidate.

Lanett and West Point Jews had good relations with their Gentile neighbors. When the local Presbyterian Church was destroyed by a tornado in 1919, its members met at Temple Beth El for several years until their church was rebuilt. Jennie Hagedorn played the piano for the Presbyterian Church. When Beth El celebrated its centennial in 1959, the pastor of the First Methodist Church gave the invocation, the minister of the First Baptist Church gave the benediction, and a local Episcopal priest gave a “scriptural lesson.” Rabbi Milton Grafman of Birmingham’s Temple Emanu-El gave the keynote address.

At the time of its 100th anniversary, Beth El had 22 member families, representing about fifty Jews. At their peak, the two towns never had more than 100 Jews combined. In 1937, 32 Jews lived in Lanett while 41 lived in West Point. Considering these small numbers, it’s truly remarkable that the congregation survived for over a century. But by 1968, according to member Fannie Herzberg, “the congregation had grown woefully small, by death of so many members, and the moving away of others.” The congregation continued on until 1977, when it disbanded and sold the temple, which was later torn down. The religious artifacts from the synagogue were given to Temple Israel in Columbus, Georgia, where most of the remaining Jews of Lanett and West Point went for services.

©2006 GOLDRING-WOLDENBERG INSTITUTE OF SOUTHERN JEWISH LIFE
CONTACT US PRIVACY POLICY

Sources

  1. Bruce H Cohen on Geni.com,
  2. Frank Fineshriber on Geni.com,

: 23 August 2015
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Zachariah (Zack) HAGEDORN

M, #I10234, b. 18 April 1856, d. 15 May 2012

Family

Marriage 1 : Jennie HEYMAN

Notes:

See notes on Phillip for personal history

Sources

  1. Bruce H Cohen on Geni.com,
  2. Ursula Matz on geni.com,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Jared Leonard WIDMAN

M, #I10235

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 15 September 2015
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Sarah WIDMAN

F, #I10236

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 15 September 2015
[TOP]


Phyllis WIDMAN

F, #I10237

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 15 September 2015
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Clara ROSENBAUM

F, #I10238, b. 10 May 1825, d. 19 April 1897

Family

Marriage 1 : Abraham HAGEDORN , b. 26 October 1819, d. 15 May 1908

  1. Phillip HAGEDORN, b. 17 January 1860, d. 23 July 1920
  2. Zachariah (Zack) HAGEDORN, b. 18 April 1856, d. 15 May 2012

Sources

  1. Ursula Matz on geni.com,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Denise Laura WIDMAN

F, #I10239

Family

Marriage 1 : Allan David LAUER

  1.    Jacob Leonard LAUER
  2.    Eva Rose LAUER

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 15 September 2015
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Ursula (Lula) HEYMAN

F, #I10240, d. 13 April 1952

Family

Marriage 1 : Phillip HAGEDORN , b. 17 January 1860, d. 23 July 1920

Sources

  1. 1910 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Herman HEYMAN

M, #I10241, b. abt. 1825

Family

Marriage 1 : Betty MERZ m. 19 February 1859 Cincinnati, Clermont, Ohio, USA

  1. Ursula (Lula) HEYMAN, d. 13 April 1952
  2. Jennie HEYMAN
  3.    Bertha HEYMAN
  4.    Arthur HEYMAN
  5.    Lee HEYMAN
  6.    Louis Philippe HEYMAN
  7.    Helen HEYMAN

Notes:

see notes on Phillip Hagedorn

: 23 August 2015
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Betty MERZ

F, #I10242

Family

Marriage 1 : Herman HEYMAN m. 19 February 1859 Cincinnati, Clermont, Ohio, USA, b. abt. 1825

  1. Ursula (Lula) HEYMAN, d. 13 April 1952
  2. Jennie HEYMAN
  3.    Bertha HEYMAN
  4.    Arthur HEYMAN
  5.    Lee HEYMAN
  6.    Louis Philippe HEYMAN
  7.    Helen HEYMAN

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Louis MERZ

M, #I10243

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Daniel MERZ

M, #I10244

: 23 August 2015
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Jennie HEYMAN

F, #I10245

Family

Marriage 1 : Zachariah (Zack) HAGEDORN , b. 18 April 1856, d. 15 May 2012

Sources

  1. Ursula Matz on geni.com,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Bertha HEYMAN

F, #I10246

Sources

  1. 1880 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Arthur HEYMAN

M, #I10247

Sources

  1. 1880 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Lee HEYMAN

M, #I10248

Sources

  1. 1880 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Louis Philippe HEYMAN

M, #I10249

Sources

  1. 1880 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Helen HEYMAN

F, #I10250

Sources

  1. 1870 census online, Familysearch.org

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]