Person Page - 179

Home Index Surnames Locations

Joseph RUBENSTEIN

M, #I8901

Family

Marriage 1 : Sadye LIPPMAN m. 16 February 1926 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA, b. 05 March 1901, d. 27 October 1943

Sources

  1. Jackson County Missouri marriage records online, http://records.jacksongov.org/results.asp

: 23 August 2015
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Sam ROSENBERG

M, #I8902, b. abt. 1899, d. 21 February 1954

Family

Marriage 1 : Nellie LIPPMAN m. 14 December 1919 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA, b. abt. 1898, d. 09 October 1958

  1.    Bernard ROSENBERG, b. abt. 1921

Sources

  1. Jackson County Missouri marriage records online, http://records.jacksongov.org/results.asp
  2. 1930 Census online,
  3. Findagrave.com, Website

: 23 August 2015
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Bernard ROSENBERG

M, #I8903, b. abt. 1921

Sources

  1. 1930 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
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William (Wolf) ROSENBERG

M, #I8904, b. 01 September 1876, d. 10 January 1948

Family

Marriage 1 : Ada COHEN , b. 08 March 1877, d. 29 July 1936

  1. Sam ROSENBERG, b. abt. 1899, d. 21 February 1954
  2.    Frances (Fannie) ROSENBERG, b. abt. 1902
  3. Ralph ROSENBERG, b. 31 July 1903, d. 11 December 1963
  4.    Pearl ROSENBERG, b. 1898

Sources

  1. 1920 Census online, From FamilySearch.org

: 23 August 2015
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Ada COHEN

F, #I8905, b. 08 March 1877, d. 29 July 1936

Family

Marriage 1 : William (Wolf) ROSENBERG , b. 01 September 1876, d. 10 January 1948

  1. Sam ROSENBERG, b. abt. 1899, d. 21 February 1954
  2.    Frances (Fannie) ROSENBERG, b. abt. 1902
  3. Ralph ROSENBERG, b. 31 July 1903, d. 11 December 1963
  4.    Pearl ROSENBERG, b. 1898

Sources

  1. 1920 Census online, From FamilySearch.org
  2. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,
  3. Missouri death records online at http://www.sos.mo.gov, Online death certificates

: 23 August 2015
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Frances (Fannie) ROSENBERG

F, #I8906, b. abt. 1902

Sources

  1. 1920 Census online, From FamilySearch.org

: 23 August 2015
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Ralph ROSENBERG

M, #I8907, b. 31 July 1903, d. 11 December 1963

Family

Marriage 1 : Bernice LIPPMAN m. 10 June 1930 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA, b. 23 June 1908, d. 27 April 1984

  1.    Larry ROSENBERG
  2.    Lewis ROSENBERG, b. 29 October 1934, d. 25 October 1989

Sources

  1. 1920 Census online, From FamilySearch.org
  2. Findagrave.com, Website

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Pearl ROSENBERG

F, #I8908, b. 1898

Sources

  1. 1910 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Louis COHEN

M, #I8909

Family

Marriage 1 : Leah LAPIN

  1. Ada COHEN, b. 08 March 1877, d. 29 July 1936

Sources

  1. Missouri death records online at http://www.sos.mo.gov, Online death certificates

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Leah LAPIN

F, #I8910

Family

Marriage 1 : Louis COHEN

  1. Ada COHEN, b. 08 March 1877, d. 29 July 1936

Sources

  1. Missouri death records online at http://www.sos.mo.gov, Online death certificates

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Bernice LIPPMAN

F, #I8911, b. 23 June 1908, d. 27 April 1984

Family

Marriage 1 : Ralph ROSENBERG m. 10 June 1930 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA, b. 31 July 1903, d. 11 December 1963

  1.    Larry ROSENBERG
  2.    Lewis ROSENBERG, b. 29 October 1934, d. 25 October 1989

Sources

  1. Jackson County Missouri marriage records online, http://records.jacksongov.org/results.asp
  2. Findagrave.com, Website
  3. 1910 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Larry ROSENBERG

M, #I8912

Sources

  1. 1940 census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Lewis ROSENBERG

M, #I8913, b. 29 October 1934, d. 25 October 1989

Sources

  1. 1940 census online,

: 23 August 2015
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Arlene ROSENBLUM

F, #I8914

Family

Marriage 1 : Leo SHALINSKY

: 23 August 2015
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Hattie RUBINSTEIN

F, #I8915

Family

Marriage 1 : Daniel ROSENBERG , b. 1895, d. 1951

  1.    Joyce ROSENBERG, b. 1922

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 14 September 2015
[TOP]


Dora WHITE

F, #I8916

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html

: 23 August 2015
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Ida WHITE

F, #I8917

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html

: 23 August 2015
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Isaac WHITE

M, #I8918

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html

: 23 August 2015
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Nn WHITE

F, #I8919

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Herschel ROSENBLUM

M, #I8920

Family

Marriage 1 : Flora FITES

  1. Aaron ROSENBLUM, d. 19 October 1933
  2. Morris ROSENBLUM, b. 1857, d. 18 November 1916
  3. Jacob ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1868, d. 14 January 1948
  4.    Goldie ROSENBLUM
  5.    Nn ROSENBLUM
  6.    Nn ROSENBLUM

Notes:

Report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor (of loving memory) at Rosenblum-White Family Reunion Dinner on July 31, 1983.

Let us start with our roots, at least as much as we know today. The known beginning of the Rosenblum-White family is in the shtetl of Neishtat, found on maps under the Russian name of Nowe Miasto or the Lithuanian name of Zemaicu Naumiestis in the State of Lithuania, USSR. And what is a shtetl it is certainly not a city, nor is it a village, rather a small town. Perlmutter, in his Yiddish book Mein Stertzev, facetiously made this list of the elements of a shtetl: (1) a post office with a telegraph, (2) a river, (3) a cemetery, (4) a rabbi, (5) a prayer house, (6) two prayer rooms for chasidim, one for the Gerer and one for the aleksanderer chasidim, (7) a Talmud Torah academy, (8) a cloister with a priest, (9) a village moron, (10) several prosperous persons. and (11) many paupers

In reality, our small town was probably a jumble of small wooden houses clustered about a market place--crowded as a slum--streets of dirt or cobblestones tortuously narrow and crooked running into alleys and back yards. The market place, the center of town, had its shops, booths, tables, stands and butcher blocks. Daily, except in the cold of winter, peasants and peasant women would come from miles around bringing their wagonloads of livestock, fish, grains, hides and produce. They bought, in exchange, the city products, which the Jews imported, such as dry goods, shoes, and household items. The Jews also lived by handicrafts, liquor distilling and some textile manufacturing.

Mostly, they were poor--or very poor, like their fathers and grandfathers. However, I doubt that they realized how poor they were, for this wasn't really important. What mattered was learning. And that learning stressed the knowledge of the Bible and the Talmud. Orthodox Judaism was not only a matter of faith, it was a way of life. The Bible was a daily newspaper.

Our known ancestors in this shtetl go back to the early 1830s, when Hershel and Mary Fega were born to the Rosenblum ~f about the same time Abraham and Flora were born to the Whites (or Vights or Fites) . Undoubtedly there were many other children of whom we have as yet no record. In time, probably in the mid 1850s, Hershel Rosenblum and Flora White were married, as were Abraham White and Mary Fega Rosenblum, the progenitors of the Rosenblum and Whites here tonight. To the Rosenblum were born five known boys and one daughter. To the Whites, were born four daughters and one son.

Now let us go back in time. How did these families originally come here? I do not know as yet how or why our ancestors settled here, but I can give you a little general background. There were probably two migrations of the Jews to Lithuania. The earlier one through southern Russia from the east, the later one from the west, mainly Germany and Bohemia. I feel that our ancestors undoubtedly came from this later migration. The Jews came to Lithuania because there was a considerable degree of tolerance and even goodwill from the rulers, largely owing to the comparatively late date at which Christianity was introduced into the country. The Jews were granted permission to dwell in the neighborhood of the synagogue and they were given the right to trade. By about 1500 the Jews living in the large cities numbered about 10,000. They received a charter in 1529 guaranteeing freedom of movement and employment. They soon monopolized foreign trade and tax farming. In 1795 Lithuania lost its independence and became a part of Russia.

The life of the Russian Jew soon sadly deteriorated. The reign of Nicholas 1, from 1825 to 1855 proved to be a nightmare. Above all else, even the pogroms, there was conscription of Jewish children that tore them away from their families at ages as young as twelve for periods up to 25 years. Not many of these children survived. In 1855 began the reign of the next tsar, Alexander II. He was called the "kindliest prince who ever ruled Russia". This was true-but only by comparison. He reduced the period of military service to 5 years, opened the doors of the universities to some Jews, and allowed Jewish businessmen to travel in many parts from which they had been barred.

When an anarchist's bomb killed Tsar Alexander II in 1881, this somewhat benign reign ended. There were soon enacted harsh anti-Jewish measures. Widespread pogroms were encouraged and harsh conscription was revived. Thus began the wave of emigration from the "Pale". And it is at this point that we rejoin our family in Neishtat.

Legend has it that the fourth son of the Rosenblum, Jacob, then about 18 or 19, joined this wave of emigration and left for England. On the boat he met and became a very good friend of Nathan Siegel. In England they were employed by the American Tobacco Co., and were soon sent to the United States. Here they first settled in West Virginia rolling cigarettes and cigars to repay their passage. One story has it that when this was accomplished and they had a few dollars in their pockets, they bought tickets on the railroad as far as their money would take them--and that was Kansas City. Fact or fiction, I do not know, but it is plausible.

And now for the facts. In 1885, the city directory of Kansas City shows a Rosenblum & Siegel, furnishing goods, at 1727 Grand, the present site of the Kansas City Star. Also listed at the same address were brother Morris and young brother Aaron, only 15. The next year Morris brought his wife Seva Rosa and young son over, as Jacob brought Anna Glickman to marry. Legend has it that Anna came here with her younger sister Fanny, later to marry Michael Rosenbloom, no relation to our family. In 1887, the brothers brought over sister Goldie to marry their good friend Nathan Siegel. By this time, the family felt the need of a Rabbi, so they sent for their cousin, Isaac White, both Rabbi and Schochet. Now, I would like to quote from his son, Hy White.

"When father arrived at the port of entry, he was of course interviewed by an official.

'What is your name?' the official asked. 'Vight' father replied.

"Did you say Fight," he asked.

"Yes," father replied.

"Do you know what the word fight means to Americans?" he queried.

'No," father promptly replied. "What does it mean?" "To us," he replied, "it means to strike at one, to hit him."

"Oh" father exclaimed.

"Well," the official said, "Why not change it to some-thing that will not bring you trouble?"

"Like what?" queried the Talmud Chochem.

'Like White," he suggested.

"All right," my father responded.

And so, Vight (Fight) became White."

This may be legend. It may be the truth. I am inclined to believe it is the truth. Anyway, we do know that the name was not White in Europe.

Soon followed sister, Ida White, to be married to Meyer Eichenberg. A few years later came younger sister Bessie to marry Robert Ginsberg, and sister Dora to marry Henry Blumgarten. In the meanwhile the Rosenblum brought over their niece, Etta, to marry Henry Harris. By the late 1890s there was a large contingent of the Rosenblums and Whites living in Kansas City. The Morris Rosenblums had five children, one of whom was Ira; Jacob had four children, Oscar, Lena, Flora and Harry. The Nathan Siegels had four children, Benjamin, Harry, Ike and daughter Rose. To the Aaron Rosenblums had been born Anna, Abe and Joseph. The Michael Rosenblooms had two sons, Joe and Oscar. The Isaac Whites had five living children, among them, Phil, who was to become a famous Yiddish actor on Broadway. You had not yet appeared on the scene, Mary (White). To Ida and Meyer Eichenberg had been born Mamie, Fanny and Morris. To the newlyweds, Bessie and Robert Ginsberg had come son Morris. Sister's Fanny, Minnie and Zelda were not to appear until the 20th century. Nephew Harry Rosenblum, father of Esther Talbot, did not arrive in the city until shortly before 1910, to live with Uncle Jacob. Nephew Gershon White, brought over by Aunt Ida and Aunt Bessie, arrived about 1902. This was a very closely-knit family, and a great part of their social life revolved around each other. I was rather amazed to find that both Marvin White, son of Hy and Anna, and Macy Rosenblum were named after my grandfather, Morris, who died in 1918.

In conclusion, I would like to mention that last fall we spent two weeks in the Soviet Union. To me, this became a very emotional experience, even more so than our visit to the state of Israel. Every night, I said a prayer of thanks to my grand-parents who had left there. For in spite of the poverty, pogroms and conscription, there was a certain security in the known. It took great courage for our ancestors to leave home and come to an alien world--as attested by the fact that six million did not.

Gershon B. White died on 4 Feb. 1967 at age 86. Address at time of death - 4618 Chestnut Kansas City Mo. He was born 20 August 1880 in Neishtat Lithuania. His parents were David Swolowski and Rose Fite. His wife was Sarah Bayless 9 Sept 1959. He is buried in the Mount Carmel Cemetery, Section 24 Lot 18.

From the records of Beth Shalom Synagogue in Kansas City Missouri.

Return to Neishtot Shtetlinks Page

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Joyce ROSENBERG

F, #I8921, b. 1922

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 14 September 2015
[TOP]


Flora FITES

F, #I8922

Family

Marriage 1 : Herschel ROSENBLUM

  1. Aaron ROSENBLUM, d. 19 October 1933
  2. Morris ROSENBLUM, b. 1857, d. 18 November 1916
  3. Jacob ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1868, d. 14 January 1948
  4.    Goldie ROSENBLUM
  5.    Nn ROSENBLUM
  6.    Nn ROSENBLUM

Notes:

Report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor (of loving memory) at Rosenblum-White Family Reunion Dinner on July 31, 1983.

Let us start with our roots, at least as much as we know today. The known beginning of the Rosenblum-White family is in the shtetl of Neishtat, found on maps under the Russian name of Nowe Miasto or the Lithuanian name of Zemaicu Naumiestis in the State of Lithuania, USSR. And what is a shtetl it is certainly not a city, nor is it a village, rather a small town. Perlmutter, in his Yiddish book Mein Stertzev, facetiously made this list of the elements of a shtetl: (1) a post office with a telegraph, (2) a river, (3) a cemetery, (4) a rabbi, (5) a prayer house, (6) two prayer rooms for chasidim, one for the Gerer and one for the aleksanderer chasidim, (7) a Talmud Torah academy, (8) a cloister with a priest, (9) a village moron, (10) several prosperous persons. and (11) many paupers

In reality, our small town was probably a jumble of small wooden houses clustered about a market place--crowded as a slum--streets of dirt or cobblestones tortuously narrow and crooked running into alleys and back yards. The market place, the center of town, had its shops, booths, tables, stands and butcher blocks. Daily, except in the cold of winter, peasants and peasant women would come from miles around bringing their wagonloads of livestock, fish, grains, hides and produce. They bought, in exchange, the city products, which the Jews imported, such as dry goods, shoes, and household items. The Jews also lived by handicrafts, liquor distilling and some textile manufacturing.

Mostly, they were poor--or very poor, like their fathers and grandfathers. However, I doubt that they realized how poor they were, for this wasn't really important. What mattered was learning. And that learning stressed the knowledge of the Bible and the Talmud. Orthodox Judaism was not only a matter of faith, it was a way of life. The Bible was a daily newspaper.

Our known ancestors in this shtetl go back to the early 1830s, when Hershel and Mary Fega were born to the Rosenblum ~f about the same time Abraham and Flora were born to the Whites (or Vights or Fites) . Undoubtedly there were many other children of whom we have as yet no record. In time, probably in the mid 1850s, Hershel Rosenblum and Flora White were married, as were Abraham White and Mary Fega Rosenblum, the progenitors of the Rosenblum and Whites here tonight. To the Rosenblum were born five known boys and one daughter. To the Whites, were born four daughters and one son.

Now let us go back in time. How did these families originally come here? I do not know as yet how or why our ancestors settled here, but I can give you a little general background. There were probably two migrations of the Jews to Lithuania. The earlier one through southern Russia from the east, the later one from the west, mainly Germany and Bohemia. I feel that our ancestors undoubtedly came from this later migration. The Jews came to Lithuania because there was a considerable degree of tolerance and even goodwill from the rulers, largely owing to the comparatively late date at which Christianity was introduced into the country. The Jews were granted permission to dwell in the neighborhood of the synagogue and they were given the right to trade. By about 1500 the Jews living in the large cities numbered about 10,000. They received a charter in 1529 guaranteeing freedom of movement and employment. They soon monopolized foreign trade and tax farming. In 1795 Lithuania lost its independence and became a part of Russia.

The life of the Russian Jew soon sadly deteriorated. The reign of Nicholas 1, from 1825 to 1855 proved to be a nightmare. Above all else, even the pogroms, there was conscription of Jewish children that tore them away from their families at ages as young as twelve for periods up to 25 years. Not many of these children survived. In 1855 began the reign of the next tsar, Alexander II. He was called the "kindliest prince who ever ruled Russia". This was true-but only by comparison. He reduced the period of military service to 5 years, opened the doors of the universities to some Jews, and allowed Jewish businessmen to travel in many parts from which they had been barred.

When an anarchist's bomb killed Tsar Alexander II in 1881, this somewhat benign reign ended. There were soon enacted harsh anti-Jewish measures. Widespread pogroms were encouraged and harsh conscription was revived. Thus began the wave of emigration from the "Pale". And it is at this point that we rejoin our family in Neishtat.

Legend has it that the fourth son of the Rosenblum, Jacob, then about 18 or 19, joined this wave of emigration and left for England. On the boat he met and became a very good friend of Nathan Siegel. In England they were employed by the American Tobacco Co., and were soon sent to the United States. Here they first settled in West Virginia rolling cigarettes and cigars to repay their passage. One story has it that when this was accomplished and they had a few dollars in their pockets, they bought tickets on the railroad as far as their money would take them--and that was Kansas City. Fact or fiction, I do not know, but it is plausible.

And now for the facts. In 1885, the city directory of Kansas City shows a Rosenblum & Siegel, furnishing goods, at 1727 Grand, the present site of the Kansas City Star. Also listed at the same address were brother Morris and young brother Aaron, only 15. The next year Morris brought his wife Seva Rosa and young son over, as Jacob brought Anna Glickman to marry. Legend has it that Anna came here with her younger sister Fanny, later to marry Michael Rosenbloom, no relation to our family. In 1887, the brothers brought over sister Goldie to marry their good friend Nathan Siegel. By this time, the family felt the need of a Rabbi, so they sent for their cousin, Isaac White, both Rabbi and Schochet. Now, I would like to quote from his son, Hy White.

"When father arrived at the port of entry, he was of course interviewed by an official.

'What is your name?' the official asked. 'Vight' father replied.

"Did you say Fight," he asked.

"Yes," father replied.

"Do you know what the word fight means to Americans?" he queried.

'No," father promptly replied. "What does it mean?" "To us," he replied, "it means to strike at one, to hit him."

"Oh" father exclaimed.

"Well," the official said, "Why not change it to some-thing that will not bring you trouble?"

"Like what?" queried the Talmud Chochem.

'Like White," he suggested.

"All right," my father responded.

And so, Vight (Fight) became White."

This may be legend. It may be the truth. I am inclined to believe it is the truth. Anyway, we do know that the name was not White in Europe.

Soon followed sister, Ida White, to be married to Meyer Eichenberg. A few years later came younger sister Bessie to marry Robert Ginsberg, and sister Dora to marry Henry Blumgarten. In the meanwhile the Rosenblum brought over their niece, Etta, to marry Henry Harris. By the late 1890s there was a large contingent of the Rosenblums and Whites living in Kansas City. The Morris Rosenblums had five children, one of whom was Ira; Jacob had four children, Oscar, Lena, Flora and Harry. The Nathan Siegels had four children, Benjamin, Harry, Ike and daughter Rose. To the Aaron Rosenblums had been born Anna, Abe and Joseph. The Michael Rosenblooms had two sons, Joe and Oscar. The Isaac Whites had five living children, among them, Phil, who was to become a famous Yiddish actor on Broadway. You had not yet appeared on the scene, Mary (White). To Ida and Meyer Eichenberg had been born Mamie, Fanny and Morris. To the newlyweds, Bessie and Robert Ginsberg had come son Morris. Sister's Fanny, Minnie and Zelda were not to appear until the 20th century. Nephew Harry Rosenblum, father of Esther Talbot, did not arrive in the city until shortly before 1910, to live with Uncle Jacob. Nephew Gershon White, brought over by Aunt Ida and Aunt Bessie, arrived about 1902. This was a very closely-knit family, and a great part of their social life revolved around each other. I was rather amazed to find that both Marvin White, son of Hy and Anna, and Macy Rosenblum were named after my grandfather, Morris, who died in 1918.

In conclusion, I would like to mention that last fall we spent two weeks in the Soviet Union. To me, this became a very emotional experience, even more so than our visit to the state of Israel. Every night, I said a prayer of thanks to my grand-parents who had left there. For in spite of the poverty, pogroms and conscription, there was a certain security in the known. It took great courage for our ancestors to leave home and come to an alien world--as attested by the fact that six million did not.

Gershon B. White died on 4 Feb. 1967 at age 86. Address at time of death - 4618 Chestnut Kansas City Mo. He was born 20 August 1880 in Neishtat Lithuania. His parents were David Swolowski and Rose Fite. His wife was Sarah Bayless 9 Sept 1959. He is buried in the Mount Carmel Cemetery, Section 24 Lot 18.

From the records of Beth Shalom Synagogue in Kansas City Missouri.

Return to Neishtot Shtetlinks Page

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Nn FITES

M, #I8923

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

  1. Abraham FITES
  2. Flora FITES

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Nn ROSENBLUM

M, #I8924

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

  1. Mary Fega ROSENBLUM
  2. Herschel ROSENBLUM

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Aaron ROSENBLUM

M, #I8925, d. 19 October 1933

Family

Marriage 1 : Celia SEVIT , b. 1871, d. 20 December 1944

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html
  2. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Morris ROSENBLUM

M, #I8926, b. 1857, d. 18 November 1916

Family

Marriage 1 : Seva Rosa (Rosa or Sarah Rose) GLATT , b. 1858, d. 16 August 1923

  1. Ira ROSENBLUM, b. 25 December 1896, d. 26 March 1975
  2. Flora ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1887
  3.    Fanny ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1888
  4.    Abraham ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1890
  5. Harry A ROSENBLUM, b. 04 January 1892, d. 04 January 1976

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html
  2. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,
  3. 1900 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Jacob ROSENBLUM

M, #I8927, b. abt. 1868, d. 14 January 1948

Family

Marriage 1 : Anna (Annie) Rose GLICKMAN m. abt. 01 June 1886 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA, b. abt. 1868

  1. Flora ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1889
  2. Harry H ROSENBLUM, b. 04 July 1896, d. 26 June 1957

Notes:

From the Rosenblum-White essay about Jacob:

Legend has it that the fourth son of the Rosenblum, Jacob, then about 18 or 19, joined this wave of emigration and left for England. On the boat he met and became a very good friend of Nathan Siegel. In England they were employed by the American Tobacco Co., and were soon sent to the United States. Here they first settled in West Virginia rolling cigarettes and cigars to repay their passage. One story has it that when this was accomplished and they had a few dollars in their pockets, they bought tickets on the railroad as far as their money would take them--and that was Kansas City. Fact or fiction, I do not know, but it is plausible

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html
  2. 1920 Census online, From FamilySearch.org

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Goldie ROSENBLUM

F, #I8928

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Nn ROSENBLUM

M, #I8929

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Nn ROSENBLUM

M, #I8930

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Seva Rosa (Rosa or Sarah Rose) GLATT

F, #I8931, b. 1858, d. 16 August 1923

Family

Marriage 1 : Morris ROSENBLUM , b. 1857, d. 18 November 1916

  1. Ira ROSENBLUM, b. 25 December 1896, d. 26 March 1975
  2. Flora ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1887
  3.    Fanny ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1888
  4.    Abraham ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1890
  5. Harry A ROSENBLUM, b. 04 January 1892, d. 04 January 1976

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,
  2. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Samuel GLATT

M, #I8932

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

  1. Seva Rosa (Rosa or Sarah Rose) GLATT, b. 1858, d. 16 August 1923

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Ira ROSENBLUM

M, #I8933, b. 25 December 1896, d. 26 March 1975

Family

Marriage 1 : Blanche GROSS , b. 1899, d. 18 February 1966

  1. Marjorie R ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1921, d. 06 September 1994
  2. Sevi Rosa ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1926

Marriage 2 : Ann GITNICK

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html
  2. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

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Flora ROSENBLUM

F, #I8934, b. abt. 1887

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

Sources

  1. 1900 Census online,
  2. Jackson County Missouri marriage records online, http://records.jacksongov.org/results.asp

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Fanny ROSENBLUM

F, #I8935, b. abt. 1888

Sources

  1. 1900 Census online,

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Abraham ROSENBLUM

M, #I8936, b. abt. 1890

Sources

  1. 1900 Census online,

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Blanche GROSS

F, #I8937, b. 1899, d. 18 February 1966

Family

Marriage 1 : Ira ROSENBLUM , b. 25 December 1896, d. 26 March 1975

  1. Marjorie R ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1921, d. 06 September 1994
  2. Sevi Rosa ROSENBLUM, b. abt. 1926

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

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Ann GITNICK

F, #I8938

Family

Marriage 1 : Ira ROSENBLUM , b. 25 December 1896, d. 26 March 1975

Marriage 2 : Nn AGRON

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

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Nn AGRON

M, #I8939

Family

Marriage 1 : Ann GITNICK

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

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Harry GROSS

M, #I8940

Family

Marriage 1 : Bessie MAROWITZ

  1. Blanche GROSS, b. 1899, d. 18 February 1966
  2.    Rosie GROSS
  3.    Manuel GROSS

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

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Bessie MAROWITZ

F, #I8941

Family

Marriage 1 : Harry GROSS

  1. Blanche GROSS, b. 1899, d. 18 February 1966
  2.    Rosie GROSS
  3.    Manuel GROSS

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

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Rosie GROSS

F, #I8942

Sources

  1. 1900 Census online,

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Manuel GROSS

M, #I8943

Sources

  1. 1900 Census online,

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Marjorie R ROSENBLUM

F, #I8944, b. abt. 1921, d. 06 September 1994

Family

Marriage 1 : Julius M KANTOR m. 10 September 1946, b. 24 June 1915, d. 01 March 2013

Sources

  1. 1930 Census online,
  2. Jackson County Missouri marriage records online, http://records.jacksongov.org/results.asp
  3. Kansas City Jewish Chronicle online,

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Sevi Rosa ROSENBLUM

F, #I8945, b. abt. 1926

Family

Marriage 1 : Melvin E KRIGEL m. 15 July 1948 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA, b. 15 May 1918, d. 05 February 2006

Sources

  1. 1930 Census online,
  2. Jackson County Missouri marriage records online, http://records.jacksongov.org/results.asp

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Melvin E KRIGEL

M, #I8946, b. 15 May 1918, d. 05 February 2006

Family

Marriage 1 : Sevi Rosa ROSENBLUM m. 15 July 1948 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA, b. abt. 1926

Sources

  1. Jackson County Missouri marriage records online, http://records.jacksongov.org/results.asp
  2. Social Security Index Online,

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Julius M KANTOR

M, #I8947, b. 24 June 1915, d. 01 March 2013

Family

Marriage 1 : Marjorie R ROSENBLUM m. 10 September 1946, b. abt. 1921, d. 06 September 1994

Notes:

From KC Jewish Chronicle online

Kantor, Dr. Julius

Print Email
Parent Category: Obituaries
Category: Archived Obituaries
Published: Thursday, 07 March 2013 12:00
Hits: 735
Dr. Julius Kantor, 97, passed away Friday, March 1, 2013, at The Atriums in Overland Park.

Funeral services were held Monday, March 4, at The Louis Memorial Chapel, with burial at Mount Carmel Cemetery. The family suggests contributions to the Marjorie and Julius Kantor Education Fund at Children’s Mercy Hospital.

Dr. Kantor was born on June 24, 1915, in Kalamazoo, Mich., to David and Slava Kantor. The family moved to Cheyenne, Wyo., shortly thereafter.

He attended the University of Wyoming and then received his medical degree at the University of Nebraska Medical School.
Dr. Kantor interned at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo., and then served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War II, where he was stationed in Gaya, India.
After the war, he completed his residency at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City and afterward began a private practice (Kantor, Bordy & Metzl) in 1946.
He was affiliated with Children’s Mercy Hospital and Menorah Medical Center from 1947 to 1990, serving two terms as president of both hospitals. He also served as a clinical assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Kansas School of Medicine and UMKC School of Medicine. He was an honorary fellow of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, American College of Allergists, American Medical Association, Missouri State Medical Association, Missouri State Allergy Society, and the Greater Kansas City Pediatric Medical Society.
Dr. Kantor married Marjorie Rosenblum on Sept. 10, 1946, and she preceded him in death on Sept. 6, 1994.
He was also preceded in death by his parents; brother, Morris Kantor; and his sisters, Mildred Eichenwald and her twin Sarah Goodman, Leah Weber and Helen Padnos.
Dr. Kantor is survived by his sons and daughters-in-law, Dr. James and Jane Ellen Kantor, San Francisco, and Brooke and Carolyn Kantor, Guanajuato, Mexico; daughter and son-in-law, Dr. Betsy Kantor Hoogenboom and Ronald Hoogenboom, Scottsdale, Ariz.; nine grandchildren; two sisters, Florence Fisher, Silver Spring, Md., and Dorothy Peltzman, Overland Park.
He was a member of Congregation Beth Shalom and was an avid golfer as well.
Dr Kantor’s life is documented in the following YouTube videos:
Julius Kantor - Part 1 - The Early Years, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4e9QMts6aI
Julius Kantor - Part 2 - The War Years, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xFn6g41LjI
Julius Kantor - Part 3 - The Kansas City Years, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJGa-ROvXNI
Online condolences may be shared at www.louismemorialchapel.com.
Arr: The Louis Memorial Chapel, 816-361-5211.

Sources

  1. Jackson County Missouri marriage records online, http://records.jacksongov.org/results.asp
  2. Kansas City Jewish Chronicle online,

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Elias A KRIGEL

M, #I8948, b. 03 June 1884, d. 15 February 1957

Family

Marriage 1 : Mamie H WITSCHNER , b. 03 June 1887, d. 16 January 1952

  1. Melvin E KRIGEL, b. 15 May 1918, d. 05 February 2006
  2.    Rose KRIGEL, b. abt. 1914
  3. Herbert M KRIGEL, b. 19 December 1923, d. 20 November 1974

Sources

  1. 1920 Census online, From FamilySearch.org
  2. Merilyn Berenbom, private resarch online,

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Mamie H WITSCHNER

F, #I8949, b. 03 June 1887, d. 16 January 1952

Family

Marriage 1 : Elias A KRIGEL , b. 03 June 1884, d. 15 February 1957

  1. Melvin E KRIGEL, b. 15 May 1918, d. 05 February 2006
  2.    Rose KRIGEL, b. abt. 1914
  3. Herbert M KRIGEL, b. 19 December 1923, d. 20 November 1974

Marriage 2 : Elias KRIEGEL

Sources

  1. 1920 Census online, From FamilySearch.org
  2. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,
  3. Howard Eichenwald, private research online,
  4. Linda Lieberman, private research,

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Rose KRIGEL

F, #I8950, b. abt. 1914

Sources

  1. 1920 Census online, From FamilySearch.org

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