Person Page - 129

Home Index Surnames Locations

Clara CARROLL

F, #I6401

Family

Marriage 1 : Nn SHEFTEL

: 23 August 2015
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Allene CARROLL

F, #I6402

: 23 August 2015
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Rebecca CARROLL

F, #I6403

Family

Marriage 1 : Nn KELNE

: 23 August 2015
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Sarah CARROLL

F, #I6404

: 23 August 2015
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Philip CARROLL

M, #I6405

: 23 August 2015
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Melvin CARROLL

M, #I6406

: 23 August 2015
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Toby CARROLL

F, #I6407

Family

Marriage 1 : Fred WALDNER

  1.    Nancy WALDNER
  2. Bob WALDNER
  3. Bill WALDNER

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Fred WALDNER

M, #I6408

Family

Marriage 1 : Toby CARROLL

  1.    Nancy WALDNER
  2. Bob WALDNER
  3. Bill WALDNER

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Nn SUTTON

M, #I6409

Family

Marriage 1 : Minnie CARROLL

: 23 August 2015
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Nn SHEFTEL

M, #I6410

Family

Marriage 1 : Clara CARROLL

: 23 August 2015
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Nn KELNE

M, #I6411

Family

Marriage 1 : Rebecca CARROLL

: 23 August 2015
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Nancy WALDNER

F, #I6412

: 23 August 2015
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Bob WALDNER

M, #I6413

Family

Marriage 1 : Michelle MCELROY

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Michelle MCELROY

F, #I6414

Family

Marriage 1 : Bob WALDNER

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Bill WALDNER

M, #I6415

Family

Marriage 1 : DEBRA

: 23 August 2015
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DEBRA

F, #I6416

Family

Marriage 1 : Bill WALDNER

: 23 August 2015
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Nn CARROLL

M, #I6417

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

  1. Bessie CARROLL, b. 25 January 1911, d. 12 September 2003
  2.    Marion CARROLL
  3. Minnie CARROLL
  4. Clara CARROLL
  5.    Allene CARROLL
  6. Rebecca CARROLL
  7.    Sarah CARROLL
  8.    Philip CARROLL
  9.    Melvin CARROLL
  10. Toby CARROLL

: 23 August 2015
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Sora WIZANSKA

F, #I6418, b. 1843

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 11 September 2015
[TOP]


Mordecai WIZANSKI

M, #I6419, b. 1852, d. 1853

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 11 September 2015
[TOP]


Martin DAVIDOW

M, #I6420

Family

Marriage 1 : BETTY

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


BETTY

F, #I6421

Family

Marriage 1 : Martin DAVIDOW

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Robert DAVIDOW

M, #I6422

Family

Marriage 1 : MIMI

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


MIMI

F, #I6423

Family

Marriage 1 : Robert DAVIDOW

: 23 August 2015
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Jerry DAVIDOW

M, #I6424

Family

Marriage 1 : LIZ

: 23 August 2015
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LIZ

F, #I6425

Family

Marriage 1 : Jerry DAVIDOW

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Abraham FITES

M, #I6426

Family

Marriage 1 : Mary Fega ROSENBLUM

  1. Bessie WHITE
  2.    Dora WHITE
  3.    Ida WHITE
  4.    Isaac WHITE
  5.    Nn WHITE

Notes:

Report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor (of loving memory) at Rosenblum-White Family Reunion Dinner on July 31, 1983.

Let us start with our roots, at least as much as we know today. The known beginning of the Rosenblum-White family is in the shtetl of Neishtat, found on maps under the Russian name of Nowe Miasto or the Lithuanian name of Zemaicu Naumiestis in the State of Lithuania, USSR. And what is a shtetl it is certainly not a city, nor is it a village, rather a small town. Perlmutter, in his Yiddish book Mein Stertzev, facetiously made this list of the elements of a shtetl: (1) a post office with a telegraph, (2) a river, (3) a cemetery, (4) a rabbi, (5) a prayer house, (6) two prayer rooms for chasidim, one for the Gerer and one for the aleksanderer chasidim, (7) a Talmud Torah academy, (8) a cloister with a priest, (9) a village moron, (10) several prosperous persons. and (11) many paupers

In reality, our small town was probably a jumble of small wooden houses clustered about a market place--crowded as a slum--streets of dirt or cobblestones tortuously narrow and crooked running into alleys and back yards. The market place, the center of town, had its shops, booths, tables, stands and butcher blocks. Daily, except in the cold of winter, peasants and peasant women would come from miles around bringing their wagonloads of livestock, fish, grains, hides and produce. They bought, in exchange, the city products, which the Jews imported, such as dry goods, shoes, and household items. The Jews also lived by handicrafts, liquor distilling and some textile manufacturing.

Mostly, they were poor--or very poor, like their fathers and grandfathers. However, I doubt that they realized how poor they were, for this wasn't really important. What mattered was learning. And that learning stressed the knowledge of the Bible and the Talmud. Orthodox Judaism was not only a matter of faith, it was a way of life. The Bible was a daily newspaper.

Our known ancestors in this shtetl go back to the early 1830s, when Hershel and Mary Fega were born to the Rosenblum ~f about the same time Abraham and Flora were born to the Whites (or Vights or Fites) . Undoubtedly there were many other children of whom we have as yet no record. In time, probably in the mid 1850s, Hershel Rosenblum and Flora White were married, as were Abraham White and Mary Fega Rosenblum, the progenitors of the Rosenblum and Whites here tonight. To the Rosenblum were born five known boys and one daughter. To the Whites, were born four daughters and one son.

Now let us go back in time. How did these families originally come here? I do not know as yet how or why our ancestors settled here, but I can give you a little general background. There were probably two migrations of the Jews to Lithuania. The earlier one through southern Russia from the east, the later one from the west, mainly Germany and Bohemia. I feel that our ancestors undoubtedly came from this later migration. The Jews came to Lithuania because there was a considerable degree of tolerance and even goodwill from the rulers, largely owing to the comparatively late date at which Christianity was introduced into the country. The Jews were granted permission to dwell in the neighborhood of the synagogue and they were given the right to trade. By about 1500 the Jews living in the large cities numbered about 10,000. They received a charter in 1529 guaranteeing freedom of movement and employment. They soon monopolized foreign trade and tax farming. In 1795 Lithuania lost its independence and became a part of Russia.

The life of the Russian Jew soon sadly deteriorated. The reign of Nicholas 1, from 1825 to 1855 proved to be a nightmare. Above all else, even the pogroms, there was conscription of Jewish children that tore them away from their families at ages as young as twelve for periods up to 25 years. Not many of these children survived. In 1855 began the reign of the next tsar, Alexander II. He was called the "kindliest prince who ever ruled Russia". This was true-but only by comparison. He reduced the period of military service to 5 years, opened the doors of the universities to some Jews, and allowed Jewish businessmen to travel in many parts from which they had been barred.

When an anarchist's bomb killed Tsar Alexander II in 1881, this somewhat benign reign ended. There were soon enacted harsh anti-Jewish measures. Widespread pogroms were encouraged and harsh conscription was revived. Thus began the wave of emigration from the "Pale". And it is at this point that we rejoin our family in Neishtat.

Legend has it that the fourth son of the Rosenblum, Jacob, then about 18 or 19, joined this wave of emigration and left for England. On the boat he met and became a very good friend of Nathan Siegel. In England they were employed by the American Tobacco Co., and were soon sent to the United States. Here they first settled in West Virginia rolling cigarettes and cigars to repay their passage. One story has it that when this was accomplished and they had a few dollars in their pockets, they bought tickets on the railroad as far as their money would take them--and that was Kansas City. Fact or fiction, I do not know, but it is plausible.

And now for the facts. In 1885, the city directory of Kansas City shows a Rosenblum & Siegel, furnishing goods, at 1727 Grand, the present site of the Kansas City Star. Also listed at the same address were brother Morris and young brother Aaron, only 15. The next year Morris brought his wife Seva Rosa and young son over, as Jacob brought Anna Glickman to marry. Legend has it that Anna came here with her younger sister Fanny, later to marry Michael Rosenbloom, no relation to our family. In 1887, the brothers brought over sister Goldie to marry their good friend Nathan Siegel. By this time, the family felt the need of a Rabbi, so they sent for their cousin, Isaac White, both Rabbi and Schochet. Now, I would like to quote from his son, Hy White.

"When father arrived at the port of entry, he was of course interviewed by an official.

'What is your name?' the official asked. 'Vight' father replied.

"Did you say Fight," he asked.

"Yes," father replied.

"Do you know what the word fight means to Americans?" he queried.

'No," father promptly replied. "What does it mean?" "To us," he replied, "it means to strike at one, to hit him."

"Oh" father exclaimed.

"Well," the official said, "Why not change it to some-thing that will not bring you trouble?"

"Like what?" queried the Talmud Chochem.

'Like White," he suggested.

"All right," my father responded.

And so, Vight (Fight) became White."

This may be legend. It may be the truth. I am inclined to believe it is the truth. Anyway, we do know that the name was not White in Europe.

Soon followed sister, Ida White, to be married to Meyer Eichenberg. A few years later came younger sister Bessie to marry Robert Ginsberg, and sister Dora to marry Henry Blumgarten. In the meanwhile the Rosenblum brought over their niece, Etta, to marry Henry Harris. By the late 1890s there was a large contingent of the Rosenblums and Whites living in Kansas City. The Morris Rosenblums had five children, one of whom was Ira; Jacob had four children, Oscar, Lena, Flora and Harry. The Nathan Siegels had four children, Benjamin, Harry, Ike and daughter Rose. To the Aaron Rosenblums had been born Anna, Abe and Joseph. The Michael Rosenblooms had two sons, Joe and Oscar. The Isaac Whites had five living children, among them, Phil, who was to become a famous Yiddish actor on Broadway. You had not yet appeared on the scene, Mary (White). To Ida and Meyer Eichenberg had been born Mamie, Fanny and Morris. To the newlyweds, Bessie and Robert Ginsberg had come son Morris. Sister's Fanny, Minnie and Zelda were not to appear until the 20th century. Nephew Harry Rosenblum, father of Esther Talbot, did not arrive in the city until shortly before 1910, to live with Uncle Jacob. Nephew Gershon White, brought over by Aunt Ida and Aunt Bessie, arrived about 1902. This was a very closely-knit family, and a great part of their social life revolved around each other. I was rather amazed to find that both Marvin White, son of Hy and Anna, and Macy Rosenblum were named after my grandfather, Morris, who died in 1918.

In conclusion, I would like to mention that last fall we spent two weeks in the Soviet Union. To me, this became a very emotional experience, even more so than our visit to the state of Israel. Every night, I said a prayer of thanks to my grand-parents who had left there. For in spite of the poverty, pogroms and conscription, there was a certain security in the known. It took great courage for our ancestors to leave home and come to an alien world--as attested by the fact that six million did not.

Gershon B. White died on 4 Feb. 1967 at age 86. Address at time of death - 4618 Chestnut Kansas City Mo. He was born 20 August 1880 in Neishtat Lithuania. His parents were David Swolowski and Rose Fite. His wife was Sarah Bayless 9 Sept 1959. He is buried in the Mount Carmel Cemetery, Section 24 Lot 18.

From the records of Beth Shalom Synagogue in Kansas City Missouri.

---------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------

Return to Neishtot Shtetlinks Page

Sources

  1. Rosenblum family - report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor, http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/naumiestis/rosenblum.html

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Mary Fega ROSENBLUM

F, #I6427

Family

Marriage 1 : Abraham FITES

  1. Bessie WHITE
  2.    Dora WHITE
  3.    Ida WHITE
  4.    Isaac WHITE
  5.    Nn WHITE

Notes:

Report by Marjorie Rosenblum Kantor (of loving memory) at Rosenblum-White Family Reunion Dinner on July 31, 1983.

Let us start with our roots, at least as much as we know today. The known beginning of the Rosenblum-White family is in the shtetl of Neishtat, found on maps under the Russian name of Nowe Miasto or the Lithuanian name of Zemaicu Naumiestis in the State of Lithuania, USSR. And what is a shtetl it is certainly not a city, nor is it a village, rather a small town. Perlmutter, in his Yiddish book Mein Stertzev, facetiously made this list of the elements of a shtetl: (1) a post office with a telegraph, (2) a river, (3) a cemetery, (4) a rabbi, (5) a prayer house, (6) two prayer rooms for chasidim, one for the Gerer and one for the aleksanderer chasidim, (7) a Talmud Torah academy, (8) a cloister with a priest, (9) a village moron, (10) several prosperous persons. and (11) many paupers

In reality, our small town was probably a jumble of small wooden houses clustered about a market place--crowded as a slum--streets of dirt or cobblestones tortuously narrow and crooked running into alleys and back yards. The market place, the center of town, had its shops, booths, tables, stands and butcher blocks. Daily, except in the cold of winter, peasants and peasant women would come from miles around bringing their wagonloads of livestock, fish, grains, hides and produce. They bought, in exchange, the city products, which the Jews imported, such as dry goods, shoes, and household items. The Jews also lived by handicrafts, liquor distilling and some textile manufacturing.

Mostly, they were poor--or very poor, like their fathers and grandfathers. However, I doubt that they realized how poor they were, for this wasn't really important. What mattered was learning. And that learning stressed the knowledge of the Bible and the Talmud. Orthodox Judaism was not only a matter of faith, it was a way of life. The Bible was a daily newspaper.

Our known ancestors in this shtetl go back to the early 1830s, when Hershel and Mary Fega were born to the Rosenblum ~f about the same time Abraham and Flora were born to the Whites (or Vights or Fites) . Undoubtedly there were many other children of whom we have as yet no record. In time, probably in the mid 1850s, Hershel Rosenblum and Flora White were married, as were Abraham White and Mary Fega Rosenblum, the progenitors of the Rosenblum and Whites here tonight. To the Rosenblum were born five known boys and one daughter. To the Whites, were born four daughters and one son.

Now let us go back in time. How did these families originally come here? I do not know as yet how or why our ancestors settled here, but I can give you a little general background. There were probably two migrations of the Jews to Lithuania. The earlier one through southern Russia from the east, the later one from the west, mainly Germany and Bohemia. I feel that our ancestors undoubtedly came from this later migration. The Jews came to Lithuania because there was a considerable degree of tolerance and even goodwill from the rulers, largely owing to the comparatively late date at which Christianity was introduced into the country. The Jews were granted permission to dwell in the neighborhood of the synagogue and they were given the right to trade. By about 1500 the Jews living in the large cities numbered about 10,000. They received a charter in 1529 guaranteeing freedom of movement and employment. They soon monopolized foreign trade and tax farming. In 1795 Lithuania lost its independence and became a part of Russia.

The life of the Russian Jew soon sadly deteriorated. The reign of Nicholas 1, from 1825 to 1855 proved to be a nightmare. Above all else, even the pogroms, there was conscription of Jewish children that tore them away from their families at ages as young as twelve for periods up to 25 years. Not many of these children survived. In 1855 began the reign of the next tsar, Alexander II. He was called the "kindliest prince who ever ruled Russia". This was true-but only by comparison. He reduced the period of military service to 5 years, opened the doors of the universities to some Jews, and allowed Jewish businessmen to travel in many parts from which they had been barred.

When an anarchist's bomb killed Tsar Alexander II in 1881, this somewhat benign reign ended. There were soon enacted harsh anti-Jewish measures. Widespread pogroms were encouraged and harsh conscription was revived. Thus began the wave of emigration from the "Pale". And it is at this point that we rejoin our family in Neishtat.

Legend has it that the fourth son of the Rosenblum, Jacob, then about 18 or 19, joined this wave of emigration and left for England. On the boat he met and became a very good friend of Nathan Siegel. In England they were employed by the American Tobacco Co., and were soon sent to the United States. Here they first settled in West Virginia rolling cigarettes and cigars to repay their passage. One story has it that when this was accomplished and they had a few dollars in their pockets, they bought tickets on the railroad as far as their money would take them--and that was Kansas City. Fact or fiction, I do not know, but it is plausible.

And now for the facts. In 1885, the city directory of Kansas City shows a Rosenblum & Siegel, furnishing goods, at 1727 Grand, the present site of the Kansas City Star. Also listed at the same address were brother Morris and young brother Aaron, only 15. The next year Morris brought his wife Seva Rosa and young son over, as Jacob brought Anna Glickman to marry. Legend has it that Anna came here with her younger sister Fanny, later to marry Michael Rosenbloom, no relation to our family. In 1887, the brothers brought over sister Goldie to marry their good friend Nathan Siegel. By this time, the family felt the need of a Rabbi, so they sent for their cousin, Isaac White, both Rabbi and Schochet. Now, I would like to quote from his son, Hy White.

"When father arrived at the port of entry, he was of course interviewed by an official.

'What is your name?' the official asked. 'Vight' father replied.

"Did you say Fight," he asked.

"Yes," father replied.

"Do you know what the word fight means to Americans?" he queried.

'No," father promptly replied. "What does it mean?" "To us," he replied, "it means to strike at one, to hit him."

"Oh" father exclaimed.

"Well," the official said, "Why not change it to some-thing that will not bring you trouble?"

"Like what?" queried the Talmud Chochem.

'Like White," he suggested.

"All right," my father responded.

And so, Vight (Fight) became White."

This may be legend. It may be the truth. I am inclined to believe it is the truth. Anyway, we do know that the name was not White in Europe.

Soon followed sister, Ida White, to be married to Meyer Eichenberg. A few years later came younger sister Bessie to marry Robert Ginsberg, and sister Dora to marry Henry Blumgarten. In the meanwhile the Rosenblum brought over their niece, Etta, to marry Henry Harris. By the late 1890s there was a large contingent of the Rosenblums and Whites living in Kansas City. The Morris Rosenblums had five children, one of whom was Ira; Jacob had four children, Oscar, Lena, Flora and Harry. The Nathan Siegels had four children, Benjamin, Harry, Ike and daughter Rose. To the Aaron Rosenblums had been born Anna, Abe and Joseph. The Michael Rosenblooms had two sons, Joe and Oscar. The Isaac Whites had five living children, among them, Phil, who was to become a famous Yiddish actor on Broadway. You had not yet appeared on the scene, Mary (White). To Ida and Meyer Eichenberg had been born Mamie, Fanny and Morris. To the newlyweds, Bessie and Robert Ginsberg had come son Morris. Sister's Fanny, Minnie and Zelda were not to appear until the 20th century. Nephew Harry Rosenblum, father of Esther Talbot, did not arrive in the city until shortly before 1910, to live with Uncle Jacob. Nephew Gershon White, brought over by Aunt Ida and Aunt Bessie, arrived about 1902. This was a very closely-knit family, and a great part of their social life revolved around each other. I was rather amazed to find that both Marvin White, son of Hy and Anna, and Macy Rosenblum were named after my grandfather, Morris, who died in 1918.

In conclusion, I would like to mention that last fall we spent two weeks in the Soviet Union. To me, this became a very emotional experience, even more so than our visit to the state of Israel. Every night, I said a prayer of thanks to my grand-parents who had left there. For in spite of the poverty, pogroms and conscription, there was a certain security in the known. It took great courage for our ancestors to leave home and come to an alien world--as attested by the fact that six million did not.

Gershon B. White died on 4 Feb. 1967 at age 86. Address at time of death - 4618 Chestnut Kansas City Mo. He was born 20 August 1880 in Neishtat Lithuania. His parents were David Swolowski and Rose Fite. His wife was Sarah Bayless 9 Sept 1959. He is buried in the Mount Carmel Cemetery, Section 24 Lot 18.

From the records of Beth Shalom Synagogue in Kansas City Missouri.

Return to Neishtot Shtetlinks Page

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Fannie GINSBERG

F, #I6428, b. abt. 1899

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Minnie GINSBERG

F, #I6429, b. 10 April 1901, d. 11 August 1978

Family

Marriage 1 : Isadore BOXER m. 01 November 1927 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA, b. 03 July 1900, d. July 1983

  1. Jean BOXER
  2. Robert BOXER

: 23 August 2015
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Sylvia GINSBERG

F, #I6430, b. abt. 1907

: 23 August 2015
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BURKE

?, #I6431, b. 1868

: 05 October 2015
[TOP]


Isadore BOXER

M, #I6432, b. 03 July 1900, d. July 1983

Family

Marriage 1 : Minnie GINSBERG m. 01 November 1927 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA, b. 10 April 1901, d. 11 August 1978

  1. Jean BOXER
  2. Robert BOXER

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Meyer TAXMAN

M, #I6433

Family

Marriage 1 : MARY

  1. Zora TAXMAN
  2. Celia TAXMAN
  3. Ruth TAXMAN
  4.    Iona TAXMAN
  5. Elliot TAXMAN
  6.    Arthur TAXMAN

: 23 August 2015
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Iona TAXMAN

F, #I6434

: 23 August 2015
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Elliot TAXMAN

M, #I6435

Family

Marriage 1 : Bettie GOTTLIEB m. 18 December 1940 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Arthur TAXMAN

M, #I6436

: 23 August 2015
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MARY

F, #I6437

Family

Marriage 1 : Meyer TAXMAN

  1. Zora TAXMAN
  2. Celia TAXMAN
  3. Ruth TAXMAN
  4.    Iona TAXMAN
  5. Elliot TAXMAN
  6.    Arthur TAXMAN

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Bettie GOTTLIEB

F, #I6438

Family

Marriage 1 : Elliot TAXMAN m. 18 December 1940 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Morris GINSBERG

M, #I6439, b. abt. 1870, d. 03 January 1948

Family

Marriage 1 : Rebecca FISHMAN , b. abt. 1874, d. 23 December 1923

  1. Frank GINSBERG, b. abt. 1902
  2. Harry GINSBERG, b. abt. 1905
  3. Charles GINSBERG, b. 19 July 1909, d. 11 April 1989
  4. David GINSBERG
  5. Sara GINSBERG, b. 20 September 1911, d. September 2007
  6. Fannie GINSBERG, b. 14 March 1896, d. 09 September 1964
  7. Pearl GINSBERG, b. abt. 1894
  8.    Nathan GINSBERG, b. abt. 1917

Marriage 2 : Sarah Lei MESHEVSKY , b. 16 February 1876, d. 20 December 1934

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,
  2. 1910 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Rebecca FISHMAN

F, #I6440, b. abt. 1874, d. 23 December 1923

Family

Marriage 1 : Morris GINSBERG , b. abt. 1870, d. 03 January 1948

  1. Frank GINSBERG, b. abt. 1902
  2. Harry GINSBERG, b. abt. 1905
  3. Charles GINSBERG, b. 19 July 1909, d. 11 April 1989
  4. David GINSBERG
  5. Sara GINSBERG, b. 20 September 1911, d. September 2007
  6. Fannie GINSBERG, b. 14 March 1896, d. 09 September 1964
  7. Pearl GINSBERG, b. abt. 1894
  8.    Nathan GINSBERG, b. abt. 1917

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,
  2. 1910 Census online,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Abraham David Baril GINSBERG

M, #I6441

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

  1. Morris GINSBERG, b. abt. 1870, d. 03 January 1948

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Unknown GINSBERG

M, #I6442

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

  1. Mark GINSBERG, b. 1857, d. 16 April 1901

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Zelda GINSBERG

F, #I6443, b. 19 July 1907, d. 26 October 2001

Family

Marriage 1 : Joseph SILVERFORB m. 11 June 1935 Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, USA, b. 05 January 1900, d. 27 April 1964

  1. Robert I SILVERFORB
  2.    David B SILVERFORB

Notes:

irth: Jul. 19, 1907
Kansas City
Jackson County
Missouri, USA
Death: Oct. 26, 2001

Kansas City Star October 28, 2001:

ZELDA GINSBERG SILVERFORB
Zelda Silverforb, 94, of Kansas City, MO, passed away Friday, October 26, 2001. Graveside services will be 1 p.m. Monday, October 29, at Sheffield Cemetery. Kindly omit flowers, family suggests contributions to Animal Haven or charity of one's choice.
Mrs. Silverforb was born July 19, 1907, in Kansas City, MO, to Robert and Bessie White Ginsberg. On June 11, 1935, she married Joseph Silverforb, who preceded her in death in 1964. Mrs. Silverforb, the youngest of four children, graduated in 1924 from Central High School. She was a sales associate for Cricket West, on the Plaza, for many years before her retirement. She was a member of Beth Shalom Synagogue and its Sisterhood, Hadassah, AMC Midwest Chapter, Denver, CO, and Shalom Geriatric Center Auxiliary. Mrs. Silverforb is survived by her sons and daughters-in-law, David B. and Nancy Silverforb, Prairie Village, KS, Robert I. and Judy Silverforb, Concord, CA; stepdaughter and husband, Dorothy and Marvin Dorfman, Leawood, KS; five grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren. (Arr.: The Louis Memorial Chapel)

Burial:
Sheffield Cemetery
Kansas City
Jackson County
Missouri, USA

Created by: Russ C
Record added: Oct 23, 2012
Find A Grave Memorial# 99484434

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Mose (Michael) GROSS

M, #I6444

Family

Marriage 1 : Eileen DAVIS

Notes:

Mose Gross, known to friends and family as Mike, always said that his real life began on December 7, 1941. That day he was 21, assigned as the Assistant Navigation Officer on the USS Helena, a light cruiser, at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. By 7 a.m., the Helena was under attack and Ensign Gross rushed to his battle station on the ship’s bridge (narrowly avoiding the fire ball from an exploding Japanese torpedo which had just struck the ship’s engine room) where he observed the entire attack unfold all around him. When he survived, he decided that day was his real birthday. So when he died on June 3, 2005, at age 84, he thought of himself as 63. He retired from the Naval Reserves as a Captain after nearly 40 years of active and reserve service (including active service in support of the Korean War.) Mose was born in 1920, in Vincennes, IN. He grew up in Petersburg, IN, one of four brothers and the son of a well known local businessman. He attended the University of Indiana for three years but left prior to graduation to join the Navy’s officer training program at Northwestern University, where he met his future wife, Eileen, and from where he received his Navy Commission in 1941. He and his wife of 62 years, Eileen, owned Davis Fabrics, a thirdgeneration business in Kansas City, until their retirement in 1981. Following retirement, he traveled the world, painted, took photographs and became an accomplished ceramicist. He attended UMKC and took many art and photography classes at the Johnson County Community College. Mose was active in a number of organizations. He served as the president of the Nelson-Atkins Print Society and the Naval Reserve Building Fund. He was on the Board of the Friends of Art. He was a member of the Lion’s Club, the Naval Reserve Association, the Navy League and the Pearl Harbor Survivor’s Association. He was president of the Landing Shopping Center Merchant’s Association. Survivors include his wife; son, Edmund Gross (Michiko) of Prairie Village; daughter, Lisa Kartus (Jesse) of Wheaton, IL; and one grandchild. Military Graveside services will be held 10 a.m. June 8, 2005, at Leavenworth National Cemetery, Leavenworth, KS. A gathering will follow 5-7 p.m. that evening at the home of Edmund Gross. Call Heartland for the address

: 23 August 2015
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Abraham BOXER

M, #I6445, b. 03 December 1869, d. 25 May 1939

Family

Marriage 1 : Minnie ZINN , b. abt. 1876, d. 08 June 1934

  1. Isadore BOXER, b. 03 July 1900, d. July 1983
  2. Anna BOXER, b. abt. 1904
  3. Mary BOXER, b. 29 April 1897, d. 28 February 1978
  4. Charles BOXER, b. 13 April 1893
  5. Hyman BOXER, b. 15 May 1891, d. 01 November 1970

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

: 23 August 2015
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Minnie ZINN

F, #I6446, b. abt. 1876, d. 08 June 1934

Family

Marriage 1 : Abraham BOXER , b. 03 December 1869, d. 25 May 1939

  1. Isadore BOXER, b. 03 July 1900, d. July 1983
  2. Anna BOXER, b. abt. 1904
  3. Mary BOXER, b. 29 April 1897, d. 28 February 1978
  4. Charles BOXER, b. 13 April 1893
  5. Hyman BOXER, b. 15 May 1891, d. 01 November 1970

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,

: 23 August 2015
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Moishe Wolf ZINN

M, #I6447, b. 1853, d. 1918

Family

Marriage 1 : RHEA , b. 1854, d. 1915

  1. Minnie ZINN, b. abt. 1876, d. 08 June 1934

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,
  2. Ancestry.com,

: 23 August 2015
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RHEA

F, #I6448, b. 1854, d. 1915

Family

Marriage 1 : Moishe Wolf ZINN , b. 1853, d. 1918

  1. Minnie ZINN, b. abt. 1876, d. 08 June 1934

Sources

  1. Gone But Not Forgotten by Anita Loeb,
  2. Ancestry.com,

: 23 August 2015
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Anna BOXER

F, #I6449, b. abt. 1904

Family

Marriage 1 : David HARTMAN , b. 20 November 1897, d. 18 July 1947

  1.    Jack HARTMAN
  2. Sandra HARTMAN

Sources

  1. Ancestry.com,

: 23 August 2015
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Aaron WIZANSKI

M, #I6450, b. 1809, d. 1893

Family

Marriage 1 : Dina FEINSILBER , b. 1810, d. 1865

  1. Jacob VISANSKI, b. 1855, d. 1921
  2. George Albert VISANSKA, b. 1837, d. 1915
  3. Merka WIZANSKA, b. 1831
  4. Celia WIZANSKA, b. 1832, d. 1921
  5. Morton ROSENBERG, b. 1839, d. 1914
  6. Freyda WIZANSKA, b. 1842
  7. Barrett Baruch VISANSKA, b. 1848, d. 1932

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 14 September 2015
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