Person Page - 106

Home Index Surnames Locations

Morris KRAMER

M, #I5251

Family

Marriage 1 : Molly LEVIN

  1.    Louis KRAMER

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Isaac WEBBER

M, #I5252

: 07 September 2015
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Sophie LEVIN

F, #I5253, d. 20 December 1959

Family

Marriage 1 : Isadore PETTERMAN , b. 20 January 1892, d. 06 July 1983

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Isadore PETTERMAN

M, #I5254, b. 20 January 1892, d. 06 July 1983

Family

Marriage 1 : Sophie LEVIN , d. 20 December 1959

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Ida WEBBER

F, #I5255

: 07 September 2015
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David WIZANSKI

M, #I5256

Family

Marriage 1 : Leah PSHEMINSKI

  1.    Hirsch WIZANSKI, b. 1844, d. 1878
  2. Isaac WIZANSKI, b. 1846, d. 1896

: 07 September 2015
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Isaac WIZANSKI

M, #I5257

Family

Marriage 1 : Bessie WEINBERG

  1.    Judah WIZANSKI
  2.    Sarah WIZANSKI
  3. Nathan WIZANSKI
  4. Solomon WIZANSKI, b. 1836, d. 1900
  5. Joseph WIZANSKI, b. 1834, d. 1890

: 07 September 2015
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Leah PSHEMINSKI

F, #I5258

Family

Marriage 1 : David WIZANSKI

  1.    Hirsch WIZANSKI, b. 1844, d. 1878
  2. Isaac WIZANSKI, b. 1846, d. 1896

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Hirsch WIZANSKI

M, #I5259, b. 1844, d. 1878

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Isaac WIZANSKI

M, #I5260, b. 1846, d. 1896

Family

Marriage 1 : Edith Ida

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
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Edith Ida

F, #I5261

Family

Marriage 1 : Isaac WIZANSKI , b. 1846, d. 1896

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Bessie WEINBERG

F, #I5262

Family

Marriage 1 : Isaac WIZANSKI

  1.    Judah WIZANSKI
  2.    Sarah WIZANSKI
  3. Nathan WIZANSKI
  4. Solomon WIZANSKI, b. 1836, d. 1900
  5. Joseph WIZANSKI, b. 1834, d. 1890

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Judah WIZANSKI

M, #I5263

: 07 September 2015
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Velvel LEVIN

M, #I5264, b. 1880, d. 1941

Family

Marriage 1 : Golda GAVRONSKY m. 1911, b. 1890, d. 1941

  1. Yekusiel LEVIN, b. 1910, d. 1941
  2.    Yaakov Aryeh Leib LEVIN, b. 1911, d. 1941
  3. Elchonon LEVIN, b. 1914, d. 1992
  4. David LEVIN, b. 27 May 1915, d. 14 May 1972
  5.    Hillel LEVIN, b. 1923, d. 1941

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Golda GAVRONSKY

F, #I5265, b. 1890, d. 1941

Family

Marriage 1 : Velvel LEVIN m. 1911, b. 1880, d. 1941

  1. Yekusiel LEVIN, b. 1910, d. 1941
  2.    Yaakov Aryeh Leib LEVIN, b. 1911, d. 1941
  3. Elchonon LEVIN, b. 1914, d. 1992
  4. David LEVIN, b. 27 May 1915, d. 14 May 1972
  5.    Hillel LEVIN, b. 1923, d. 1941

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Yekusiel LEVIN

M, #I5266, b. 1910, d. 1941

Family

Marriage 1 : Frade VILONSKY , b. 1912, d. 1941

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Frade VILONSKY

F, #I5267, b. 1912, d. 1941

Family

Marriage 1 : Yekusiel LEVIN , b. 1910, d. 1941

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Sarah WIZANSKI

F, #I5268

: 07 September 2015
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Nathan WIZANSKI

M, #I5269

Family

Marriage 1 : Rose BRESLAU , b. 1826, d. 1891

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Yaakov Aryeh Leib LEVIN

M, #I5270, b. 1911, d. 1941

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Kushel GAVRONSKY

M, #I5271

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

  1. Golda GAVRONSKY, b. 1890, d. 1941

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Elchonon LEVIN

M, #I5272, b. 1914, d. 1992

Family

Marriage 1 : Bluma BLUMENTHAL , d. 1991

  1.    Galya LEVIN
  2. Nina LEVIN
  3.    Misha LEVIN

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Bluma BLUMENTHAL

F, #I5273, d. 1991

Family

Marriage 1 : Elchonon LEVIN , b. 1914, d. 1992

  1.    Galya LEVIN
  2. Nina LEVIN
  3.    Misha LEVIN

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Galya LEVIN

F, #I5274

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Nina LEVIN

F, #I5275

Family

Marriage 1 : Moula WOLFF

  1.    David WOLFF
  2.    Sasha WOLFF

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Moula WOLFF

M, #I5276

Family

Marriage 1 : Nina LEVIN

  1.    David WOLFF
  2.    Sasha WOLFF

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


David WOLFF

M, #I5277

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Sasha WOLFF

F, #I5278

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Misha LEVIN

M, #I5279

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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David LEVIN

M, #I5280, b. 27 May 1915, d. 14 May 1972

Family

Marriage 1 : Rochel ROSENZWEIG

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Rochel ROSENZWEIG

F, #I5281

Family

Marriage 1 : David LEVIN , b. 27 May 1915, d. 14 May 1972

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
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Solomon WIZANSKI

M, #I5282, b. 1836, d. 1900

Family

Marriage 1 : Paulina ANTHONY , b. 23 March 1842, d. 18 February 1878

  1.    Solomon WIZANSKI, b. 1867
  2.    Samuel WIZANSKI, b. 1867, d. 1917
  3. Ezekial WIZANSKI, b. 1868, d. 1927
  4. Esther WIZANSKI, b. 1871, d. 1901
  5. Isaac WIZANSKI
  6. Bessie WIZANSKI, b. 1871
  7. Maurice CLARK

Marriage 2 : Esther GOODMAN , b. 1858, d. 1935

  1. Nathan WIZANSKI, b. 1879, d. 1956
  2. Alexander WIZANSKI, b. 1883, d. 1945
  3.    Sadie Pearl WIZANSKI

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Paulina ANTHONY

F, #I5283, b. 23 March 1842, d. 18 February 1878

Family

Marriage 1 : Solomon WIZANSKI , b. 1836, d. 1900

  1.    Solomon WIZANSKI, b. 1867
  2.    Samuel WIZANSKI, b. 1867, d. 1917
  3. Ezekial WIZANSKI, b. 1868, d. 1927
  4. Esther WIZANSKI, b. 1871, d. 1901
  5. Isaac WIZANSKI
  6. Bessie WIZANSKI, b. 1871
  7. Maurice CLARK

: 07 September 2015
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Samuel ANTHONY

M, #I5284

Family

Marriage 1 : Esther

  1. Paulina ANTHONY, b. 23 March 1842, d. 18 February 1878

: 07 September 2015
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Esther

F, #I5285

Family

Marriage 1 : Samuel ANTHONY

  1. Paulina ANTHONY, b. 23 March 1842, d. 18 February 1878

: 07 September 2015
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Rose BRESLAU

F, #I5286, b. 1826, d. 1891

Family

Marriage 1 : Nathan WIZANSKI

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Solomon WIZANSKI

M, #I5287, b. 1867

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Chasya BLOCH

F, #I5288

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

  1. Rochel ROSENZWEIG

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Samuel WIZANSKI

M, #I5289, b. 1867, d. 1917

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Ezekial WIZANSKI

M, #I5290, b. 1868, d. 1927

Family

Marriage 1 : UNKNOWN

  1. Pauline WIZANSKI

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Pauline WIZANSKI

F, #I5291

Family

Marriage 1 : NN SIMPSON

  1.    Jeanne SIMPSON

: 07 September 2015
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Hillel LEVIN

M, #I5292, b. 1923, d. 1941

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Bernice LEVIN

F, #I5293, b. 11 February 1916, d. 22 July 2001

Family

Marriage 1 : Fritz NEUGARTEN , b. 26 March 1910, d. 1990

  1.    Dail NEUGARTEN
  2.    Jerry NEUGARTEN

Notes:

Neugarten, Bernice Levin (11 Feb. 1916-22 July 2001), psychologist, was born in Norfolk, Nebraska, the daughter of David Levin, a clothing merchant, and Sadie Segal. She received her B.A. from the University of Chicago in 1936, majoring in English and French literature. At the same institution she received both her M.A. in educational psychology in 1937 and her Ph.D. from the interdisciplinary Committee on Human Development in 1943. In 1940, she married Fritz Neugarten; they had two children.

Neugarten's interest in adult development and aging arose when she, along with her mentor Robert J. Havighurst, was conducting research for her dissertation, which focused on personality development during the second half of life in a community in Kansas City, Missouri, through interviews, questionnaires, and participant observation. She found that general conceptions and social stereotypes such as the midlife crisis and the empty-nest syndrome were applicable to only a small number of mature individuals. Instead, Neugarten concluded that most individuals over age fifty generally succeeded in leading lives that were meaningful and satisfying. Most of them experienced retirement as a transition to a different set of activities, characterized by increased community and family involvement, and they found this new set of activities profoundly rewarding. This study led Neugarten to formulate her basic ideas on adult development, which she further developed and propagated during the rest of her career. She was not only interested in further investigating lifelong development, but also in making recommendations with respect to social policies towards the elderly.

In 1951--after having taken time to focus on starting her family--Neugarten returned to the University of Chicago as a faculty member of the Committee on Human Development, conducting research on adult development and aging. In 1958 she was named director of the university's Graduate Training Program in Adult Development and Aging. During these years, she focused on adulthood in terms of lifelong development, which she investigated from a psychological and a sociological perspective. Her major contributions focused on age as a dimension of social organization and gave psychological and social perspectives on the life course.

In 1974 Neugarten coined the phrases "young-old" and "old-old" to summarize the major ideas that had inspired her research. The young-old represent the majority of older individuals who are healthy, competent, and satisfied with their role in society. They remain vigorous, engage in a variety of activities, and experience high levels of satisfaction with life. The old-old are those individuals who are frail, suffer from poor health, and are in need of medical attention, special care, and other forms of support. Neugarten argued that aging individuals ought to be described in terms of both competencies and needs.

During the 1980s, while an emeritus professor at Chicago, Neugarten was affiliated with Northwestern University, where she set up a program in Human Development and Social Policy. There she focused on social policy towards the elderly. She argued that public policy that provides benefits to individuals as an entitlement merely on the basis of their age is inherently misguided because age is not strongly related to an individual's needs or capacities. Instead, she argued, benefits to the elderly should be provided on the basis of socioeconomic and health status. In addition, retired individuals should be characterized not only by their needs and dependence but also by their distinct interests--interests that cause them to provide many services to the community without expecting financial remuneration. All too often, Neugarten observed, the interests of different age-groups had been pitted against each other in the political arena. In particular, older Americans have often been seen as a powerful political interest group. To counter this, Neugarten proposed the principle of intergenerational equity as a basis for social policy and argued that an age-integrated society must be maintained.

Neugarten argued forcefully that any form of social assistance to the elderly needed to be need-based rather than an entitlement. This recommendation has been translated into social policy to a certain extent. Neugarten served on a great number of policy-making bodies. In 1971 she was appointed a member of the Technical Committee on Research and Demonstration for the White House Conference on Aging. An appointment to the Federal Council on Aging followed in 1978. Neugarten was a founding member of the National Institute on Aging, of which she also became an advisory council member. Neugarten helped organize the 1982 White House Conference on Aging. She served as president of the American Gerontological Society in 1969. She received the Gold Medal Award for life contributions from the American Psychological Foundation in 1994.

Neugarten returned to the University of Chicago as the Rothschild Distinguished Scholar at the Center on Aging, Health, and Society and remained there until her retirement in 1994. She became active in the area of social ethics, exploring with Robert Havighurst the ethical and social consequences of increasing life expectancy and measures that could extend the human life span.

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


Fritz NEUGARTEN

M, #I5294, b. 26 March 1910, d. 1990

Family

Marriage 1 : Bernice LEVIN , b. 11 February 1916, d. 22 July 2001

  1.    Dail NEUGARTEN
  2.    Jerry NEUGARTEN

Sources

  1. Jewishgen.org,

: 23 August 2015
[TOP]


NN SIMPSON

M, #I5295

Family

Marriage 1 : Pauline WIZANSKI

  1.    Jeanne SIMPSON

: 07 September 2015
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Jeanne SIMPSON

F, #I5296

: 07 September 2015
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Esther WIZANSKI

F, #I5297, b. 1871, d. 1901

Family

Marriage 1 : Richard CLOON

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Richard CLOON

M, #I5298

Family

Marriage 1 : Esther WIZANSKI , b. 1871, d. 1901

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Isaac WIZANSKI

M, #I5299

Family

Marriage 1 : Octavia

Sources

  1. Morton Jessup ROSE genealogy,

: 07 September 2015
[TOP]


Octavia

F, #I5300

Family

Marriage 1 : Isaac WIZANSKI

: 07 September 2015
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